Archive

Archive for the ‘Mexico’ Category

Adventures in San Diego Jewish History, September 3, 1954, Part 4

July 12, 2010 Leave a comment

Compiled by San Diego Jewish World staff

A Grievous Loss (Editorial)
Southwestern Jewish Press, September 3, 1954, Page 7

The Jewish Community lost one of its outstanding leaders last week with the passing of George Neumann, at the age of 69.  He and his wife, Julia, had been pioneers and leaders in every worthwhile activity in the Jewish Community since 1918.

Founders of the Hebrew Home for the Aged, they gave not only money, but their time and energy to provide a last refuge for those in need. A life-long devoted member of Temple Beth Israel, he served on the board for many years and was instrumental in the lifting of the mortgage.

Any group or organization which sought to alleviate people’s suffering could enlist the aid of this most worthy Jew.  His generous contributions to the United Jewish Fund and the State of Israel Bonds were only a small part of his effort to do his share for his co-religionists in need.

Among the many virtues “Uncle” George possessed was his sweet modesty. The burdens he undertook were unknown to most people, since he never sought honors or recognition.  He was content to let his deeds speak for him.  His aid to individuals in distress were legion and unknown.  He was benefactor to many and like the true Jew he was, his deeds were never told.

George Neumann’s geniality and quiet good sense will be sorely missed in this community.  He was a true “Elder Statesman.” – Requiescat in pace.

*
A Goal Is Set (Editorial)
Southwestern Jewish Press, September 3, 1954, Page 7

All of us have goals in business and in our personal lives.  If we are really interested, we strive to reach those goals… if the goal is important enough, we deprive ourselves willingly of other things which we feel are not as important as that one big thing. Usually, our goals are individual or concern only our families and friends.

A different type of family, much larger and more diverse in their personal lives and desires has also set a goal.  The goal they have decided upon affects all of us in some way because we are all members of this community family.  We owe it to ourselves to follow through on this project and through our own efforts of the other members of the community.

The citizens of San Diego have set a goal … for $1,350,000 to help those members of the community who need help.  In typical family spirit, other members can be counted upon to help where help is needed.

As a  citizen of this community, you are also a member of this unique family… don’t let the other members down.  Support THE Community Cause, the Second United Success Drive.

*
Something To Think About  (Editorial)

Southwestern Jewish Press, September 3, 1954, Page 7

The decision by the United Jewish Fund of St. Paul, Minn., to impose “ethically sound community sanctions” against persons holding positions of leadership or responsibility, whose pledges to the Fund are considered inadequate, should be of some interest here.

The board which passed this resolution (by vote of 23 to 2) stated that “such sanctions are based on the principle that an individual’s adequate discharge of major community responsibilities must be precedent to his occupying a position of leadership in our community organizations.”

The idea of giving responsibility to only those who give according to their ability has been discussed in this community from time to time by our leaders. If this should become a trend throughout the nation some decision will no doubt be made in order to insure adequate fund raising.

According to the latest information from our United Jewish Fund, the 1954 Drive will need additional effort if the minimum goal that was set is to be reached.

*
From Where I Sit
Southwestern Jewish Press, September 3, 1954, Page 7

By Mel Goldberg

Herb Seltzer is reported to have sold a car to a young sailor with the parting advice, “Bring it back for a checkup when you’ve got 500 miles on it.”… The sailor left completely enthralled over his shiny new Chevvy … Next morning when Herb arrived at the salesroom, the sailor was standing around … With trepidation, Herb questioned him as to what was the matter … “Oh nothing,” said the Navy man.  “You said to bring the car in when I got 500 miles on it.  I stayed up all night driving 500 miles.” …

We have very flatly spent our last dollar in Baja California.  IT will be a cold, cold day in July when they catch us down there again. .. To begin, some of the plush joints spend a fortune on tricking you to come down there and what happens?  You discover a place that probably cost a quarter of a million dollars to construct, with rest-room facilities that resemble the municipal dump of a central Mississippi town…. We stopped at an alleged fabulous spot, with a score of “shleppers” hanging around the lobby, looking fort a fas t buck … and yet, the management did not see fit to assign one of those domestic to the rest room to perform such simple tasks as placing paper in the (A) empty paper towel rack and )B) the other type of paper dispenser one finds in a tiled sanctuary…

Somehow, this seems a more important duty than having a chap handy with the physical stamina to carry our 13-ounce featherweight overnight bag, the twenty-foot distance from the trunk of the car to the lobby desk… In closing, we have traveled every 1st and 2nd class road in Baja California and we have yet to discover a wash room that can be judged satisfactory….

Jai Alai’s Fronton Palace came fairly close to getting an okeh, but the woman operator we had assigned to investigate the ladies’ room delivered the following report: “Cleanliness was satisfactory, however no paper in any of the booths, and hostess was more concerned with turning on the faucet in sink, than in securing additional paper.”  A pox on you, old Fronton Palace!

Bill Schwartz and Berenice Soule seem to have been carried away over battling about Shakespeare in the last edition of the Jewish Press … May we add a few words? … Being an intellectual slob we state: As to which is the most offending “The Merchant of Venice,” “Othello,” or any of Shakespeare’s material is like asking how do you want to die; by burning or drowning? …

John Ruskin took his son, David, to Del Mar, for a day at  the races.  Ruskin, an engineer, selected a horse, “Lone Deal” via a methodical system.  He told David to bet $5 on the horse for place .  David walked to the window and asked for the number. The man who takes the wagers demanded another $1… David had mistakenly purchased a ticket for “across the board.”  …He was too embarrassed about it to tell his father until the race was over… You see the race was a photo-finish and Lone Dal paid $80.  

And where were you when Senator McCarthy spoke at the $100-a0plate dinner last week?…

*
Jews in American History~300 Years

Southwestern Jewish Press, September 3, 1954, Page 7

By Dr. Philip L. Seman, University of Judaism

California has grown tremendously in population and developed as an industrial state particularly within the last quarter of a century. During these last twenty-five years, Southern California has developed culturally as well. This is largely due to the unusual growth in population.  We learn much of the progress in California and mainly in Southern California from Harris Newmark’s book “Sixty Years in Southern California,” containing his reminiscences from 1853, the year he came to Los Angeles, until 1913.  We note an optimistic prophecy concerning the future that Los Angeles is destined to become the world center, prominent in almost every field of human endeavor.

In 1854 the first steps were taken to establish a Jewish cemetery and not long after the first Jewish child was buried there.  It was Joseph Newmark who inspired the purchase of land for the cemetery. Largely, because the name of Newmark is so closely connected with the growth of Los Angeles we may spend a moment with Joseph Newmark, who was an uncle of Harris Newmark.  Born in 1799, he came to America in 1824. He spent a few years in New York and, during his residence there, started the Elm St. Synagogue, one of the earliest in America.  Immediately after reaching Los Angeles, he organized the Los Angeles Hebrew Benevolent Society which probably was the first charitable institution in the city. Although Mr. Newmark had never served as a salaried rabbi, he had been ordained and was permitted to officiate.  Harris Newmark broke ground for the Jewish Orphans’ Home which in 1925 moved to Vista del Mar near Culver City as a cottage plan institution.

Harris Newmark tells us that in 1865 a Los Angeles merchant, David Solomon, called on  him and related that while returning by steamer from the north, Prudent Beaudry had made a boast that he would drive every Jew in Los Angeles out of business. Thu we see that the Jew in Los Angeles nearly ninety years ago was not among the best loved of people.  However, the progress made by such pioneers as Harris Newmark and others is indicative that while such “crack pot” statements made from time to time were not very encouraging, nevertheless hard, determined work will win out in the end as it has, if one reviews the progress made in business as well as in cultural endeavors.

*
United Success Drive Names Chairman

Southwestern Jewish Press, September 3, 1954, Page 8

Names of five more persons to work on the Second United Success Drive of the San Diego area Community Chest were announced this week by George A. Scott, chairman.

Sol Bloom will be group chairman for the Retail A section. This group includes specialties, department stores, locker clubs, variety stores, clothing stores and furniture stores.

Victor Schulman will assist him as chairman of the furniture section.

Norman Kaufman will head Hotels Section and will be responsible for the recruitment and supervision of campaigners to solicit this area.

Murray Goodrich will be vice chairman of the Individual Pace Setters Division.  In this capacity, he will be in charge of campaigning those persons who are giving $500 or more and who cannot be reached at their place of business.

Edward A. Breitbard, chairman of the Service Group, will be responsible for the campaigning of cleaners, social service, mortuaries, hospitals, advertising and amusements.

“This is our primary job, taking precedence over all other interests, for we know that success in our business and personal affairs depends in large measure on our success in this undertaking,” Scott said.

The drive will begin September 8 with a luncheon at El Cortez Hotel for the Pace Setters and Commerce and Industry Divisions. Guest speaker will be General of the Army Omar N. Bradley, who is national campaign chairman of the United Defense Fund-USO, a Red Feather organization.

*
(Mode of travel)
Southwestern Jewish Press, September 3, 1954, Page 8

No man has ever been known to travel far on a lame excuse.

*
Jewish War Veterans Auxiliary
Southwestern Jewish Press, September 3, 1954, Page 8

Forty hospitalized patients from the Naval Hospital were guests of San Diego Post 185, Jewish War Veterans and Auxiliary at the football game played Sept. 1 at the Balboa Bowl between the College Prep Stars and High School Stars.  This annual charity classic is sponsored by the Breitbard Foundation.

*
New Café Offers Tempting Dishes
Southwestern Jewish Press, September 3, 1954, Page 8

Oskar Goldschmied and Kurt Adam have purchased the Orange Belt Café at 807 Broadway. Recent refugees from Czechoslovakia, they will serve Continental Food, specializing in Hungarian dishes such as Hungarian Goulash, Vienna Schnitzel, Gefilte Fish and other popular dishes.

The Orange Belt Café will open at 8:00 a.m. for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Special lunches are from 67 cents and dinners are a la carte.

*
Hereafter Don’t Count
Southwestern Jewish Press, September 3, 1954, Page 8

Dying penniless is not what worries some people—it is having to live that way.

*
Jewish Community Center
Southwestern Jewish Press, September 3, 1954, Page 8

Rhythmic Exercise Class—During the month of September, Mrs. Esther Moorsteen has graciously offered the use of her patio for the Center Rhythmic Exercise Class.  Women are invited to bring a sandwich and coffee will be served after the class.  Again children are welcome and a baby sitter will be available upon the mother’s request.  Mrs. Moorsteen resides at 4370 Arista Drive.

 Modern Dance Class—All women interested I the beginners modern dance techniques are invited to participate in the group meeting at the Jewish Community Center on Wednesday evenings at 8 p.m. under the leadership of Mrs. Eugene Berger.  This is an opportunity for all working women (including the housewife) to relax and enjoy and evening of rhythmic exercise and creative dancing,. For further information call the Center at Atwater 1-7744.

Center Women’s League – There will be a meeting of the Center Women’s League on Thursday afternoon at 1 p.m., September 16th at the Jewish Community Center.  The nominating committee with Mrs. Milton Fredman as chairman and including Mesdames Sam Bennett, Jos. Kwint, Eugene Berger and Ben Ferber will present a slate of officers for the coming year. All women interested I participating in the development of the Jewish Community Center are invited to attend.

Cooperative Nursery School – The Cooperative Nursery School will hold open house at the Center, 3227 El Cajon Blvd., on Sunday, Sept. 12th, from 3 to 5 p.m.  All pre-school children and parents are invited to attend and inspect the facilities.  Refreshments will be served.

“We are busy planning for the fall term of the Cooperative Nursery School for the Jewish Community Center which commences September 15,” announced Mrs. Melvin Karzen, chairman at a parents’ and children’s picnic held recently at Presidio Park.  The purchase of new equipment and the repainting of nursery school tables and chairs head the list of activities for mothers and fathers.

This will be the second year for the Community Center Nursery School.  Anyone interested mnay contact Mrs. Bert Eifer, Juniper 2-4824.

Teen-Agers—There will be a meeting of all Teen-Agers who attend high school and college on Thursday evening, Sept. 9th, at 8:30 p.m. to discuss and plan the fall program at the Center.  Committees will be chosen and the special events being planned and teenagers are requested to help plan those activities that interest them.

Volunteer Leaders –With the beginning of the fall program year, the Jewish Community Center has been requested to organize clubs, play groups and classes for various age groups. Such groups can only be organized with adequate leadership and so we are asking for both men and women who are mature, and are interested in children, to volunteer their services.  The minimum time necessary for such participation is five hours per week and any person who has skills such as games, leadership, arts and crafts, dramatics and athletics are especially welcome. A special training course, to discuss the problems of leadership and the necessary skills required, will be developed within the next month. Please call Mr. Posin at the Center office to volunteer your help.

*
“New Faces” Theme Set by Hadassah

Southwestern Jewish Press, September 3, 1954, Page 8

Mrs. Harry Felson, newly elected president, will hold her first official meeting of Hadassah on Wednesday, Sept. 15. At 12 noon at the Temple Center. The theme of the initial meeting will highlight “New Faces of 1955” and all new members are especially asked to attend the luncheon meeting.  In addition to honoring new members, Mrs. Harold Elden will address a special tribute to the old members of the chapter.

Following a very successful Membership Tea, Mrs. Edward Kitaen, membership chairman, will again be in charge of the meeting and assisted by her same capable committee, Mmes. Manuel Haffner, Rodin Horrow, Ray Smith, Ray Lowitz, Howard Hoffman, Archie Bushnell, Elmer Wohl, George Wixen and Fred Leonard.

Mrs. Morton Thaler, program chairman, promises a laugh a minute with a clever presentation called “Take a Number.”  A very informative and entertaining afternoon is definitely assured, so make reservations early with Mr. Howard Hoffman, AT-4-8681.

* *
“Adventures in San Diego Jewish History” is sponsored by Inland Industries Group LP in memory of long-time San Diego Jewish community leader Marie (Mrs. Gabriel) Berg. Our “Adventures in San Diego Jewish History” series will be a regular feature until we run out of history.  To find stories on specific individuals or organizations, type their names in our search box.

*
 

Adventures in San Diego Jewish History, August 20, 1954, part 2

July 6, 2010 Leave a comment


Compiled by San Diego Jewish World staff

Personals
Southwestern Jewish Press, August 20, 1954, page 3

Guest Time – Summer time becomes smug-time for San Diegans.  For no matter what part of the country our guests come, we need never apologize for that “unusual weather.”

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Cohen, had as their guest her sister, Miss Glenna Lipit of New York.  Miss Lipit visited Catalina and relatives in Bevberly Hills and was impressed with all we have to offer, she’s sure to be back soon.

Visiting the Al Hutlers for two weeks are Al’s sister and brother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Max Becker and daughter, Frances, of Chicago.

Mr. and Mrs. Lester Alweis and children, Donald and Lane, of Lewistown, Mont., have been guests of their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Alweis.

Mr and Mrs. Richard Moorsteen and Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Slater and daughter, Amy, will arrive next week to be houseguests of their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Moorsteen.

Betty, Len, Dick and Pat are ow on a hiking trip through Yosemite Park.

Mrs. H. Berner has young Mike Williams (Michael Schwartz) to thank for prolonging her father’s stay here.  Mr. Cecil Coleman of Venice, Calif., planned to spend just a weekend with his daughter but was so impressed with young Mike’s talents he stayed a full week in order to catch Mike’s TV appearance last Saturday.

Champions in the Making – Judy Karp, daughter of MR. and Mrs. Lou Karp, at 8 years of age, has the makings of a golf champion.  Last year she won her first championship at the Presidio Golf Course Tournament held for girls. This year, playing an exhibition match she made a hole-in-one on a 110-yard drive with a number 7 iron.  She is rated by golf professionals as the best girl prospect for the year.  Judy will defend her championship at Presidio Hills at the tournament to be held about Sept. 10.  Don’t say we didn’t warn you that you will be hearing more from this miniature “Babe.”

Another outstanding athlete to be watched is Martin Schiller of Pacific Beach.  He will compete next week in the 5th Annual Jr. Tennis Tournament in Balboa Park, August 23-26.

Aloha – The picture of the hula dancers on the post card received from Ike Jacobson make it easy to see why Ike finds Hawaii “a wonderful place to enjoy yourself.”

New Home – Congratulations to Sol and Eve Chenkin who have moved into their lovely new home at 5924 Adams Avenue.

Horrors! Florida! – Alan Mishne, president of Zeta Beta Tau State College Chapter will fly to Miami, Florida to attend the 56th Annual ZBT Convention on August 25.  He will be met in Miami by Harvey Goodfriend who, at the present time, is vacationing in New York. Following the convention, Alan will fly to Cleveland to visit with the Mishne family.

Welcome Party—
The Leah Weinberg Memorial Minyan held their meeting Saturday night in the form of a party with all the husbands attending. This was to honor the return of MRs. Louis Stitzel’s sister, Mrs. Shirley Rebuf, to San Diego and the Minyon.

Dinner and cocktails were served in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Stitzel.

*
Dr. and Mrs. Charles A. Fleischner will leave San Diego on September 4 for an extended four-month vacation through Mexico, Central and South America and the Caribbean Islands. They will visit with relatives in Buenos Aires, Rio de Janeiro and Caracas, and on their return trip will spend Thanksgiving with Mrs. Fleischner’s sister in New York and Florida, and also visit with her mother and other members of their family in Chicago.  They will return to their home via New Orleans late in December. The entire trip will be made via Pan American.

Thanks – Lee and Morris Douglas wish to thank all their friends for their many kindnesses during Lee’s recent illness.

*

Sisterhood Ship to Sail for Membership

Southwestern Jewish Press, August 20, 1954, page 3

You are invited to join the Tifereth Israel Sisterhood aboard the S.S. Memberhip, which will be launched from the Tifereth Israel Patio on Tuesday, August 31, at 8 p.m.

The Membership Ship and dock will be festively decorated by Mrs. Lawrence Cantor and Mrs. Harry Mallen, co-chairmen, while Mrs. Sam Sklar and Mrs. Henry Price will have charge of the galley.

The Membership Skipper, Mrs. Ben Gordon, urges all women who have not received their cruise tickets to call her at CY-5-7143.

The Membership Program Captain, Mrs. Daniel Orlansky, and her crew of sailors, Mmes. Ida Wax, Tillie Gordon, Evelyn Baranov, Betty Feller, Edna Gardner, Dorothy Belkin, Rose Felstein, Raye Lenett, Natalie Smith, Lillian Zemen, Roan Oglesby, Jean Finkleman and Betty Blane promise an entertaining and exceptionally smooth voyage.

*
(Admiration)
Southwestern Jewish Press, August 20, 1954, page 3

Admiration is a polite recognition of another’s resemblance to ourselves

*
Cradle

Southwestern Jewish Press, August 20, 1954, page 3

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Levenson announce the birth of their second daughter, Arlene Lori, born July 28. Big sister, 2 ½  year old Nancy, is delighted with her new playmate.

Grandparents are Mrs. Rhoda Dombroff and Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Levenson.

*
Deborah Ann Kuntz, born to Dr. and Mrs. Seymour Kuntz, on August 8, will have 4 ½ year old twin sisters, Barbara Susan and Carolyn Louise waiting on her every need.

Grandparents are Hyman Kuntz of Chicago and Anna Kanefsky.
*
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Packer (Edith Schertzer) announce the birth of their first child, a son, Charles Harvey, on August 13.  Grandparent are Mr. and Mrs. Julius Packer of New York City and Mr. and Mrs. Louis Schertzer.

Present for the Bris to be held August 22  at the Schertzer residence will be young Charles’ great-aunt, Mrs. Rose Schneider, and daughter, Shirley, of New York.

*
Every day Eleanor has something new and wondrous to report to Irv about “Sandy,” the new master of the Kahn homestead.  Daughter, Barbara, who is away at camp, still awaits the thrill of greeting the new arrival.

Samuel James (Sandy) was born July 21.  Maternal grandmother is Mrs. Samuel Barlin of Santa Monica.  Paternal grandparents are Mrs. Fanny Kahn and Mr. A.J. Kahn.

*
Classified
Southwestern Jewish Press, August 20, 1954, page 3

Large Bedroom with adjoining bath for employed lady in widow’s home.  ½ block to 3 buses. Very reasonable. Phone CY-5-4309.

*
Calendar
Southwestern Jewish Press, August 20, 1954, page 3

August
21st—City of Hope Jr. Aux Barbecue – 6845 Rolando Knolls Dr., La Mesa – 7:30 p.m.

21st—Y.J.C. Club Pot Luck Supper –Tifereth Israel Center – 8:00 p.m.

22nd – Beth Jacob P.T.A. Basket Picnic – 6th and Laurel—10:30 a.m.

23rd—Lasker Lodge Talent Show – Temple Center –9:00 p.m.

26th—Temple Beth Israel Semi-Annual Meeting.

29th—Hebrew Home for the Aged annual Meeting and Installation – 2:00 p.m.

31st – Tifereth Israel Sisterhood Membership Party – T.I. Patio – 8:00 p.m .

September
11th –Cottage of Israel 4th Annual Open Meeting –Tifereth Israel Center – 8:00 p.m.

19th—Poale Zion 2nd Annual Dinner –House of Hospitality.

*
Beth Jacob News
Southwestern Jewish Press, August 20, 1954, page 3

The Beth Jacob P.T.A. will hold a Family Basket Picnic on Sunday, August 22, at Balbo Park, Sixth and Laurel Sts.  Games will begin promptly at 10:30 a.m. Bring your own lunch.  Ice cream and cold drionks will be furnished for the children and available for adults.

There will be fun and surprises for all. Be sure to bring your family for a wonderful relaxing day.

Hebrew School classes at Beth Jacob resumed on Tuesday, August 17 and will meet on Tuesday and Thursday. Bar Mitzvah classes will meet Monday and Wednesday.

If you have a child of 6 years. And upward register him in Hebrew School. There is no tuition for members of the Congregation. All children are welcome.

For information call the Congregation office, AT-2-2676.

*

Jewish Community Center

Southwestern Jewish Press, August 20, 1954, page 4

Junior Hi — Junior High group found it necessary to postpone plans for a beach party in order to prevent conflict with the Day Camp program.  Party is now scheduled to be held Monday evening, August 30.  All those participating are to meet at the Jewish center at 4:30 … The Day Camp bus will take them to Santa Clara Point. Program includes swimming, wienie roast and cam p fire games with singing, etc.

The following members are responsible for planning the program: Eddie Varon, Mel Brav, Randy Selton, Linda Hess and Roberta Schwartz.  All Junior High youngsters interested in participating are urged to call the Center for detailed information.  A 75c charge will cover the cost of the cook-out and transportation.  The group will return to the Center at 9 p.m. where they’re to be met by their parents.

Parents are urgently needed as chaperons for the above event and are requested to phone the Center to assist in the program.

Volunteer Recruitment Program
—The Center is now busy developing plans for the organization of clubs and special interest groups for the club year beginning Sept. 15. The success of such a program will depend largely upon the support given by the community. We need volunteers to serve as Club Leaders for Junior High and High School age youngsters, play leaders for younger children, and people with special skills such as dancing, musical accompaniment, dramatics, crafts, etc.  People with special hobbies are urged to discuss their interests with a member of the Center staff since such hobbies as stamp collecting, photography, etc., could be developed into excellent Center programs.

Members of the Jewish community are invited to call the Center and let us know whether their youngsters are interested in affiliating with a club. Specific information regarding age and interest will enable the Center to provide a program that will truly meet the needs of the community.

Camp Jaycee—Two hundred forty campers shared in the exciting Camp Jaycee activities which concluded its eighth season on Friday, August 20.  The youngsters learned how to work, live and play together while participating in swimming, horseback riding, hiking, overnight camp-outs, cook,-outs and trips to various San Diego County sites including the military installations of the naval air station, submarine base and coast guard station.  Plans are already under way for the two weeks’ winter school vacation camp period from December 20-31.

‘Call Me Moishe’—A near capacity crowed enjoyed the talents of the Jewish Community Center teen-agers who presented their original musical comedy, “Call me Moishe,” on Saturday, August 14 att Beth Jacob Center.  With the script and music written by Irwin Schatzman, Elaine Shapery and the teens and an orchestra of Ruth Moskowitz, Geo. Wise, Gary Cantor, Gary Fine, Roger Brenes and Sandy Ratner accompanying, the case headed by Leani Leichtag, Irwin Schatzman, Linda Douglas, Gary Cork, Shirley Kaufman, Linda Zuckerman, Sonia Weitzman, Debbie Strauss, Suzy Hutler, Bob Johanis, Steve Rose, Jerry Mendell, Norman Kellner, Phil Brenes, Judy Aved, Diane Fogelman, Adriene Cantor, Janet and Susan Solof, romped through an evening of enjoyable entertainment.

Our hat’s off to Miss Ettie Mallinger and Don Merken, who not only directed the presentation but presented stellar performances in a last minute emergency absence of cast members.

*

City of Hope News
Southwestern Jewish Press, August 20, 1954, page 4

To beat the heat and most important, to raise money for the new Leukemia Wing of the City of Hope Hospital in Duarte, the City of Hope Junior Auxiliary have planned a Twilight Patio Supper Barbecue Party at the home of Rosalie and Harold Reisman, 6845 Rolando Knolls, La Mesa, on Saturday, August 21, at 7:30 p.m.

For a $1.00 donation they promise dancing, games, prizes, lots of fun and food galore.  Everyone is invited to come and bring their friends. For reservations call Selma Lindenfeld, JU-2-6329.

*
Cottage of Israel
Southwestern Jewish Press, August 20, 1954, page 4

An exceptionally attractive program has already been set up for our Fourth Annual Open Meeting which will take place at the North Auditorium of Tifereth Israel Center on Saturday, Septeber 11, at 8 p.m. The Nominating Committee has set up the following slate of new officers: President, Seymour Gates; Vice President, Dr. Hy Parrell; Treasurer, Phil Abrams; Recording Secretary, Martha Feiler, and Financial secretary, Bess Borushek, with names of delegates left open.

Election will take place at this meeting.

A special treat for this evening will be an address on the commemoration of the 50th anniversary of Theodore Herzl’s death by Mr. John H. Ellsworth, President of the San Diego Museum of Man.

*
Breitbard Group Invites Grid Stars
Southwestern Jewish Press, August 20, 1954, page 4

SAN DIEGO_-Player invitations have been sent 29 outstanding Southern California high school grid stars to participate in the Breitbard Athletic Foundation’s Sixth Annual Southern California College Prep All-Star Charity Football game here Sept. 1.

All of tho0se invited are graduated high school seniors. Each was invited on the basis of outstanding prep play during the 1953 football campaign.  Only the top available talent is invited each year for the game, which annually pits the All-Southern Cal grads against a similar-picked team of All-Los Angeles City gridders.

*
City of Hope Auxiliary

Southwestern Jewish Press, August 20, 1954, page 4

All members who offered their services to the United Success Drive are to report to 1266 7th St. between the hours of 8:30 and 5.  You can phone Academy 3-7191 to find out when they need you the most!  Did you know that San Diegans who were patients at the City of Hope in the last five years received 4115 hospital days at a cost of $82,300.00?

*
Del Mar “Track Offers $10,000 Handicap Race
Southwestern Jewish Press, August 20, 1954, page 4

DEL MAR, Aug. 20 – Older route horses, priming for the $25,000 added Del Mar Handicap later in the season, get their first big test here Saturday in the $10,000 added San Diego Handicap over a mile and one-sixteenth.

Twelve horses, representing 10 different interests, are slated to clash in the San Diego, a race which annually separates the wheat from the chaff among the top handicap horses sstabled here.

*
(Hebrew Home)
Southwestern Jewish Press, August 20, 1954, page 4

Application for admission to the Hebrew Home for the Aged may be made through the Jewish Social Service Agency, 333 Plaza, BE-2-5172.

*
Double Talk
Southwestern Jewish Press, August 20, 1954, page 4

By Janet & Susan Solof

Better get in that extra bit of fun
You better take in the beach and the sun
For school is coming on its way
September 12 is the awaiting day.

“They were having a ball” was what the kids reported about Ruth Moskowitz’s party. Throwing the ball of fun were Jackie Sharpe, Diane Fogelman, Linda Zuckerman, Stan Breitbard, Jan Klaskin, Judy Aved, Ronnie Doctor, Nancy Goodman, Ruth Freidman, Gary and Eddie Naiman, Susan Solof, Roberta Wyloge, Eve Zwanziger, Alan Friedman, Betty Krasnow, Evelyn Witz, Lewis Lucowitz, Carole Toole.

“A line a day?” was what Henry Bray, Alice Lee, Linda Douglas, Martin Winer, Jean Goldstein, Roberta Wyloge, Al Abrams, Elaine Burdman and Ethel Gardiner said to Danny Schaeffer (sic, Schaffer) when they said their good-byes to Danny, at a party given by Judy Yukon. Danny is going to Harvard and we wish him the very best.

Georgette Lesser helped make her cousin, Ken Kadet’s visit memorable. Dancing and eating in her patio with her friends made it quite complete.

It was a surprise when Sandy Byrock walked into a terrific party given by Linda Zuckerman and Susie Hutler and all Sandy’s friends. IT was the official good bye as Sandy is leaving San Diego to live in Santa Monica.

*
(Speed Ahead)
Southwestern Jewish Press, August 20, 1954, page 4

The man who puts on too much speed ahead may meet reverses.

*
Unveiling
Southwestern Jewish Press, August 20, 1954, page 4

The unveiling of a monument for Joseph Dembo will take place at the Home of Peace Cemetery on Sunday, August 29, at 2;00 p.m. Friends are cordially invited to attend.

*
Ensenada Fair to Begin in August
Southwestern Jewish Press, August 20, 1954, page 4

Preparations for Ensenada’s greatest fair, “Feria de Todos Santos,” are in full swing and will be completed much before the August 28th opening date.

A month long event, the fair will feature colorful Mexican entertainment including native dances, rodeos, cock fights, bull fighting demonstrations, grease pole contests and varied fun facilities with each day being highlighted by honoring one of Baja California’s prime attributes.

The fairgrounds, covering several acres of land immediately opposite Ensenada’s luxurious Bahia Hotel, will be a blaze of lights as the colorful concession and carnival gayety create a Mexican version of a “Great White Way.”  All games of chance permitted by the Mexican law will be presented with much wagering expected on all sides.

*
(Driver’s License)

Southwestern Jewish Press, August 20, 1954, page 4

A driver’s license is a license for life or death – depending on how you use it.

*
(Politics)
Southwestern Jewish Press, August 20, 1954, page 4

At this time politics are on vacation – but even so considerable bait is being dug.

*
(Pay Scale)
Southwestern Jewish Press, August 20, 1954, page 4

Nowadays if a man makes half enough to live on he has to be paid twice as much as he is worth.

*

“Adventures in Jewish History” is sponsored by Inland Industries Group LP in memory of long-time San Diego Jewish community leader Marie (Mrs. Gabriel) Berg. Our “Adventures in San Diego Jewish History” series will be a regular feature until we run out of history.  To find stories on specific individuals or organizations, type their names in our search box.

Adventures in San Diego Jewish History, August 6, 1954, Part 3

July 3, 2010 Leave a comment

Compiled by San Diego Jewish World staff
Southwestern Jewish Press, August 6, 1954, Page 5

Terror in Rumania (Editorial)

Recent revelations regarding the reign of terror conducted by the Communist Government against Zionists there have shocked many in the free world.  Communists in Israel, faced by the news that 200 Zionist leaders in Rumania have been imprisoned, have been reduced to the absurdity of saying that no one has ever been imprisoned for his opinions in a Communist state, and that the whole matter is merely an instance of “United States psychological warfare.”

For those who have followed the history of the Soviet and Communist attitude toward Zionism over the past decades, since before even 1q917, this news comes as no surprise. To Communists, Zionism is merely another form of “bourgeois nationalism” which must be combated just as Moscow combats, for example, the desire of Ukrainians for liberty.  In the Nineteen twenties and Nineteen Thirties tens of thousands of Zionists were sent to Soviet slave-labor camps, and the numbers of these slaves were multiplied still further when the Soviet seizures of Eastern Poland and the Baltic states greatly increased the Jewish population in the Soviet Union.

In Rumania, as in other Communist countries, all those who work for freedom and for release from the Muscovite bondage are “Traitors.” The Zionists now being punished for their effort to free Jews from the general enslavement that is Rumanian life today are martyrs to the common struggle against oppression.  The free world must seek their release, as part of the efforts to support all friends of freedom – of all nationalities, cultures and religions—behind the Iron Curtain.

*
A Little Known Group (Editorial)

Southwestern Jewish Press, August 6, 1954, Page 5

Very few people in this community are aware of the work of the Jewish Labor Committee and the important part it plays in the nation’s trade union movement. As far back as 1933 the Jewish Labor Committee began an underground rescue movement that did heroic work in saving thousands of Jewish lives from Hitler’s maniacal grasp.

In addition to their work in fighting prejudice in the A.F. of L. and the C.I.O the Committee carries on a program of child care, food and clothing shipments, and distribution of books to Europe and Israel.

The Committee was the first to recognize, in 1949, the full meaning of Soviet anti-semitism and exposed it in a series of carefully documented studies. It has been a prime mover in the settlement of Jewish restitution claims with Germany and Austria.

The Jewish Labor Committee is the arm of the organized Jewish Community in the trade union movement. To achieve its goal the Committee looks to every community for increased support for the urgent tasks that remain to be carried out. The small but dedicated group that has been devoting itself to this work for many years should be encouraged and supported.

*
From Where I Sit
Southwestern Jewish Press, August 6, 1954, Page 5

By Mel Goldberg

Lots of talk about certain clubs around San Diego discriminating against Jews through the quota system … If this matter were deeply checked, it would be discovered that in one case at least, and possibly two, the quota system is in effect largely through the efforts of some Jewish members.  Amidst their zealousness to keep out “unpolished” brethren, they have seen fit to compromise principles by allowing the existence of membership selectivity based on a “religious” rather than an “environmental” background qualification.

Just an afterthought! … We can supply the victim in the following incident, if anyone doesn’t believe it and wants proof.  A Jewish fellow, that we know, applied for a job within the last two weeks. The prospective employer was Jewish too.  At the conclusion of the interview, the “business” man turned to the job seeker and blatantly stated, “You could probably handle the job okeh, but I’ll tell you frankly, I make it a point never to hire a Jew.” … The confused lad didn’t hang around to see if the gentleman carried a Klu Klux Klan card or contributed to the Gerald K. Smith for President drive….

Wouldn’t it be nice if the banks would start spending their money in paying a decent interest rate, rather than by outvying each other in building Taj Mahals on El Cajon Blvd.  Local savings and loan associations, too, give you a big deal … They pay 3% and just 135 miles north in L.A., they pay  3 ½ %… Bet if a vote were taken among the banks’ customers, they’d rather have the ½ % and do business in reconverted dry-docked tuna boats for buildings.

Dan Weinberg claims to have overheard a couple of Texans discussing a mutual friend at Del Mar.  “He says he’s as rich as we are,” said the one oil and cattle and baron.  “Why that four-flusher,” responded the other, “he’s never had over twenty million dollars in his pocket in his entire life.”

Jack Lowenbein tells of a man who came home carrying a large parcel for his wife.  “Look, dear,” he said, “I didn’t forget your birthday.  I bought you a beautiful mink stole”, … “But,” the wife reminded him, “you promised me a new car.” …”I know,” said hubby, “but, where can you buy an imitation Cadillac wholesale.” …

Speaking of fur coats, there’s a woman in Pt. Loma, who owns one and during the hot summer months, she wraps it in a cheap suitcase and stores the whole shebang in her home deep freezer. When chilly weather rolls around, she hauls it out, moth free and looking like a million…

The following vignette is over 6 weeks old. To prevent identification, we have held off comments for the last 3 issues.  Now it can be told … A couple of local matrons flew over to Las Vegas on the Q.T. … It had been assumed hereabouts that they were spending a couple of days shopping in Los Angeles.  Anyway, while in Vegas, the two 40 plus gals had quite a gay time.  They met two guys, real smooth types, who were in their late 20s. Our two women felt proud that with all the pretty things floating about, these handsome young fellows would be attracted to them.

The evening was going along well. … dinner, etc., and then the payoff.  Sometime during the course of the evening the two Romeos disappeared with the galss’ purses…which included all their cash and papers… A couple of collect phone calls to the husbands in San Diego and a wired money order headed the ladies homeward. … We are happy to report that all was forgiven and our two San Diegans are much wiser for it all.

One of the Los Angeles Anglo-Jewish newspapers, “The Voice,” carried the story of an interview with the Governor of Baja California and according to the story, gambling will be legally licensed at Rosarito Beach within the  next 60 days. .. On his visit to England, Groucho Marx was asked by a reporter, “I hear you’re paid $300,000 a year for being rude to people … what would you do if you had Senator McCarthy on your program?”  … Groucho’s instant reply was: “I’d work free for a week.” … Ruth Brody wrote from New York that she saw an English car on Fifth Avenue that was so small, the windshield was a monocle. … Report around that Liberace would like to get married—anybody know where he can find a girl shaped like a piano?

*
Emergency March of Dimes Drive Begins Aug. 16th
Southwestern Jewish Press, August 6, 1954, Page 5

San Diego will conduct an Emergency March of Dimes August 16 through 31, Thomas V. Prendergast, chairman of the San Diego Chapter of the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis, announced recently. The campaign will parallel a similar drive held throughout the nation by the National Foundation during the last two weeks in August.

Following a special meeting Monday, August 2, at Chapter headquarters, 3609 Fourth Ave., Prendergast announced that Jerry Rudrauff and Thomas Sefton will be co-chairmen for the Emergency March of Dimes.  Rudrauff conducted the Chapter’s regular drive in January this year.

*
No Future
Southwestern Jewish Press, August 6, 1954, Page 5

The surest way to have no future is to live in the belief that the future is tomorrow.

*
Jews in American History~300 Years
Southwestern Jewish Press, August 6, 1954, Page 5

By Dr. Philip L. Seman, University of Judaism

In 1852, over one hundred years ago, Rabbi Abraham Joseph Ash appealed for the support of Beth Hamidrash, the first Russian-Jewish congregation to be established in the United States, and soon thereafter it became the center of religious orthodoxy and defense against the encroachment of Reform Judaism. This was the only institution in the country at the time when religious studies were pursued according to the traditional East-European patterns. Since 1857 and particularly beginning with 1881 when East European immigration began in large numbers due to the atrocities in Poland and Russia, and again for the same reasons from Rumania in 1892 the orthodox group grew in numbers and consequently in the number of synagogues and institutions to the extent that for some time they represented the preponderant group in this country in most all large cities.

Today this group has two large educational institutions preparing students for the Orthodox Rabbinate, the Yeshiva University and the Hebrew Theological College of New York and Chicago.

The founders of the Beth Hamidrash were few, we are told in an account of the founding of the institution.  They established it in poverty,.  However, they watched over it with loving care. As the record reads, through the members were poor in money, they were prominent with a liberal spirit; they labored hard for their daily bread, and yet set aside from their limited means a portion for the “holy” offering, to support the might of the law.  We further learn from a foot note to this interesting story from Isaac Lesser’ in “The Accident XIV” and in the American Jewish Historical Society Publication 1901, that when Sampson Simson died in 1857, he left $2000 to the Beth Hamidrash, as well as $3000 to Shearith Israel of which he was a member, and $1000 to Columbia College, of which he was an alumnus.

Thus Orthodoxy in the sense as we understand it now was established in this country about 100 years ago.

*
As the Psychologist Sees You

Southwestern Jewish Press, August 6, 1954, Page 6

By Irving R. Stone, Psychological Consultant

Regaining Mental Health—Although we have made great strides in our attitude toward mental illness, with greater acceptance of treatment, in the minds of many it is still a disgrace for one to need help with his emotional problems. Why this is so, we do not know, for a person is no more responsible for psychological ill health than he is for physical ill health. Perhaps it is felt that a person can get over a physical illness but not one that is mental.  That is far from the truth.

Regaining mental health is now more possible than ever, especially when we seek the help that is necessary before it becomes too severe. Today there are thousands of persons who once were patients in mental hospitals and are now considered as recovered and even many more thousands who suffered from a psychoneurotic illness and benefitted from out-patient treatment.   When we consider the small number of former patients of mental hospitals who return for further treatment, in comparison to the number discharged each year, we see how effective are our treatment methods.

The prime factor in regaining mental health is the selection of a qualified therapist. In a private consultation with a psychiatrist or psychologist it is necessary to see that these therapists are qualified through board certification or license. Usually, we can assume that the therapists are qualified when we apply to a clinic or hospital, especially those sponsored by governmental agencies.  A county medical society or the local psychological organization often has a list of qualified practitioners in the community.

There are a number of therapies which are used to aid in the recovery of mental health and each is selected in accordance with the age and problem of the patient.  For adults, the most frequently used is that of psychotherapy.  This affords the patient an opportunity to unburden himself of disturbing thoughts, fears, frustrations, and conflicts and at the same time, with the aid of the therapist, to gain insight or understanding into his problem.

With children, play therapy is most frequently used. The child expresses himself I play situations and drawings or rids himself of aggressive feelings through physical activities. Here, again, the therapist allows the child to express himself and interpret, on the child’s level, some of the things which are disturbing him.  At the same time, the child feels that he now has someone who is interested in him as an individual.  Often the therapist takes the place in the child’s mind of an absent father or mother.

For the more severely disturbed, shock therapies are used, the most popular of which is electro-shock. While we do not know as yet how or why electro-shock works, we do know that it usually does work, especially with those severely depressed. Insulin shock is used most frequently with patients suffering from schizophrenia.  The lest used therapy is that of psychosurgery which, while it does alleviate the condition of the patient in many case, modifies or interferes with brain functioning.

The possibility of success in the treatment process is in direct ratio to the early introduction of therapy. Regaining Mental Health is possible but needs public understanding and the acceptance of treatment methods and the individual who has been treated.

*
Jewish Community Center
Southwestern Jewish Press, August 6, 1954, Page 6

Camp Jaycee
- Camp Jaycee has exciting plans in store for its campers during the month of August. Plans for the remainder of the month include and over-night camp for the eleven year olds during the seventh week and a special all camp program during the last week of camp.

Camp Jaycee has had many requests from parents to extend the camp season for two additional weeks ending Sept 3, rather than August 20.  All parents interested in the additional camping period are urged to register with the Center before August 13.

Junior High Program –
Monday night has been lounge night at the Jewish Community Center for the Junior High crowd all summer. Program has included square and social dancing and party games.  The parents of the participants have given splendid cooperation and have serve refreshments. A beach party for the group will be held on August 16. All junior high youngsters interested in participating in the program are welcome to attend and should call the Center, AT 1-7744 so that they will receive notices of future activities.

Fiesta Club—Plans for reorganization of the Fiesta Club are now under way. All young adults between the ages of 18 and 35 are urged to contact the Center for additional information. A new and exciting program will be presented if enough interest is expressed in the formation of the new group.

You’ve A Date to Meet Moishe! – On Saturday, August 14, 8:30 p.m. at Beth Israel Center, the Jewish Community Center Teens will present an original musical comedy,” Call Me Moishe!”  Actors, singers and dancers are all hard at work to make this a truly memorable evening.  The Center Teens have written the script, designed the sets and costumes and planned a show to suit every taste.  Mr. Don Merkin of Columbus, Ohio, is directing.

Tickets may be obtained from the Center Teens or by calling AT-1-7744.

Remember the date, Sat., August 14—You’ll remember the show.

Modern Dance Group – A beginners Modern Dance Group has been added to the activities of our Wednesday evening rhythmic exercise class for women. Also conducted by Lilo Berger, this class promises to be a particularly stimulating one – and at no extra cost. The fee covers both activities.

*
Chaim Weitzmann Poale Zion
Southwestern Jewish Press, August 6, 1954, Page 6

The annual regional Poale Zion Conference will take place in Los Angeles on August 28 and 29 at the Institute of Aeronautical Sciences, 7660 Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles, and it is hoped a representative gathering from the Chiam Weitzmann San Diego will be present at those interesting sessions.

Happens Every Day
Southwestern Jewish Press, August 6, 1954, Page 6

Allowances have to be made for some college students and most parents do – weekly.

*
Please Note!
Southwestern Jewish Press, August 6, 1954, Page 6

Temple Beth Israel members are asked to reserve Thursday evening, August 26, for a vitally important Semi-Annual Meeting. More details will follow in the August 20 issue of the Southwestern Jewish Press.

*
(Hebrew Home)

Southwestern Jewish Press, August 6, 1954, Page 6

Application for admission to the Hebrew Home for the Aged may be made through the Jewish Social Service Agency, 333 Plaza, BE-2-5172.

*

Adventures in Jewish History” is sponsored by Inland Industries Group LP in memory of long-time San Diego Jewish community leader Marie (Mrs. Gabriel) Berg. Our “Adventures in San Diego Jewish History” series will be a regular feature until we run out of history.  To find stories on specific individuals or organizations, type their names in our search box.

Adventures in San Diego Jewish History, August 6, 1954, part 2

July 2, 2010 Leave a comment

Compiled by San Diego Jewish World staff

Personals
Southwestern Jewish Press, August 6, 1954, Page 3

Succumbing to the lure of our neighbor to the south are Zelma and Sid Goldstein who left for a seven day plane trip through Mexico. Among the interesting places they will visit are Cuernavaca, Taxco and Mexico City.

*
Rabbi and Mrs. Morton J. Cohn with Jane and Morton Jr. left Saturday for the Camp of Living Judaism at Saratoga for a regular session of the Jewish Youth Conference.  Rabbi Cohn will be the dean of the conference.

Also attending the camp which attracts about 350 high school and college age students are Rochelle Goodrich, Brenda Heiman and Leani Leichtag.

*
Mr. and Mrs. Irving Schneider had as their houseguest for a week, her cousin Miss Arlene Brinn of New York.  Miss Brinn combined business with pleasure on her trip to San Francisco and Canada. While in San Diego she was entertained by members of her family, Mrs. Jennie Siner, Mrs. Sophie Garber, and MRs. Sam Shapov.

In Los Angeles, Miss Brinn was feted by Rabbi and Mrs. N.I. Addleson and their daughter and son-in-law, Dr. and Mrs. Frank Kholos.

*
Sid Sonnabaum, son of Mrs. Rosalie Sonnabaum, has returned home from Pars where he served with the Armed Forces for two years and is enjoying the rest of the summer becoming reacquainted with his friends. Sid will be enrolled at State College in the fall.

*
Mannie and Betty Adler and son, Louis, used almost every means of travel, including plane, train, boat and taxi to reach a resort on Vancouver Island, British Columbia.  They spent a week at Shawnigan Lake, several days in Victoria and San Francisco, and a day each in Portland and Seattle.

*
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Garber left this week to visit their children in Duluth, Minn., Milwaukee, Wisc., and New York. The two big moments of the trip will be the introduction to two new grandchildren, one 2 weeks old and one 4 weeks old.

*
Mrs. Elsie Meyer has as her guest for the summer, her aunt, Mrs. Ines Schwartz of New York, whom she hasn’t seen since they parted 17 years ago in a small German town.  Mrs. Schwartz lived for a time in Mexico City, but this is her first visit to California.

The only disappointment of Mrs. Schwartz’ visit is the fact that she hasn’t seen Mrs. Meyer’s son, Horace, who is stationed in Korea with the Air Corps.
*

Mr. and Mrs. Irving Friedman and family are taking a week’s motor tour to Northern California.  Irv will do a little business on the side, of course.

*
Mrs. Etta Bilgray of New York is visiting for a month with her aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Addleson.  Her any cousins in San Diego have rolled out the red carpet and are keeping her occupied.  She accompanied Mr. and Mrs. Harry Wax to San Francisco this week for the B’nai B’rith Convention.

*
Rabbi and Mrs. N.I. Addleson of Hollywood were vacationing in La Jolla last week. They spent the time visiting with their children and sisters and brothers. Rabbi Addleson will rejoin his congregation in time for the High Holy Days.

*
Morris Breitbard, daughter Sylvia, and son in law Babe Bard, will leave on a six-week trip back East.  Picking up a new car in Detroit, they will drive through Canada, Niagara Falls, New York City, Washington, and Virgina and visit relatives en route.

*
Mrs. Harry Goodwin has returned from a trip that was to have taken two months, but due to transportation difficulties that turned into a blessing, lasted for six months. After visiting her sister and family in New Zealand, Mrs. Goodwin spent some time in Australia and returned to the States via France and England.  While in England she stopped in her native Leeds.

Unquestionably, Harry is delighted to have the traveler home.

*
Mrs. Ida Addis and family wish to thank their friends for their kindnesses during their recent bereavement.

*
Mr. George Neumann wishes to thank his friends for all their kindness during his recent illness.

*
Is Our Face Red Dept – Don’t know when we’ve been as happy to reprint a retraction: Our report that the S.Z. Greenbergs are moving to El Centro couldn’t have been wronger. As a matter of fact, they’re still in Europe and having a wonderful time.

Boner No 2: Mickey Rosenberg was given the wrong parents in our last issue… his real mother an father are Mr. and Mrs. Sol Rosenberg.

*
Council of Jewish Women Holds Membership Tea
Southwestern Jewish Press, August 6, 1954, Page 3

The National Council of Jewish Women will hold its annual garden membership tea on Tuesday, August 17, 1:30 p.m. at the home of Mrs. Sol Price, 2345 Juan St.  President Mrs. Milton Roberts and members of the Board will be hostesses.

A musical theme, “Sunflower,” identified with the invitations will introduce the musical program featuring Council’s Glee Club under the direction of Mrs. Ed Merkin.  Glee Club members are Mrs. Robert Beitscher, Leo Sarfan, Harry Furgatch and Sid Smith accompanied on the piano by Mrs. Sidney Silverman. An “Oklahoma “musical parody will present Council’s program in a melodious manner.  Star attraction will be the guest appearance of Betty Hall Jones, popular song stylist.

Membership chairman in charge of this event is Mrs. E. Morris Sims and her co-chairman is Mrs. William Gerelick. Program chairman is Mrs. Robert Drexler. Reservations are being taken by Mrs. Milton Effron, AC-2-1859, and Mrs. Lester Himmel, JU-2-8432.

*
“Magic of Hawaii” Theme of Hadassah
Southwestern Jewish Press, August 6, 1954, Page 3

Hadassah will present Mrs. Leo Hirsch of Los Angeles at a Membership Tea on August 9, at the Kona Kai Club. As vice president of the Southern Pacific Coast Region, Mrs. Hirsch will outline the many varied projects of the organization which comprises a national membership of 350,000 women.

Coupled with this gracious speaker will be a fashion showing  of imports directly from the shores of the Islands, which will capture “The Magic of Hawaii.”

Mrs. Edward Kitaen, membership chairman, is confident that the 500 (or over) membership mark will be accomplished after this pleasurable afternoon.  Joining Mrs. Kitaen is Mrs. Manuel Hafner, co-chairman, in extending this invitation to all no-Hadassah members to meet the new officers and members as guests of the chapter.  Invitations are being sent to members at a cost of $1.55.
Invitations must be obtained in order to attend the Tea. The following women will be glad to accept your request and offer any in formatijon: Mmes Edward Kitaen, HO-9-1389; Archie Bushnell, AT-2-9136; Fred Leonard, CO-4-4524; and Manuel Hafner, AC-2-2876.

*
Cradle
Southwestern Jewish Press, August 6, 1954, Page 3

Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Meyers are rejoicing over “three of a kind” since 7 lb, 8 oz Steven Mark joined brothers Philip Brent and David Lee on July 14.  Equally pleased is grandmother, Mrs. Ida Addis.

*
Seven pound young Miss Marti Ilene was born to Mr. and Mrs. Stuart Penter on July 20.  Grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Max Greenberg and Mr. and Mrs. Its Penter, will have the time of their lives spoiling the  newest member of the family.

*
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Weitzen, Jr., and 15 month old Steven welcomed ito their home Harold Frederick, born July 31.  Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Glickman and MR. and Mrs. Fred Weitzen are the happy grandparents.

*
Classified

Southwestern Jewish Press, August 6, 1954, Page 3

ROOM FOR RENT – Gentleman or lady; quiet, light, clean airy room; kitchen privileges; garage and use of telephone.  Near Bus No. 2.  Phone BE-4-5624 evenings.

ROOM FOR RENT  for lady, in very nice private home. Cooking privileges. ½ block from the bus. Call before 11:00 a.m. or after 6:00 p.m., aT-4-6586.

LARGE BEDROOM with adjoining bath in widow’s home for employhed lady.  ½ block to 3 buses. Very reasonable.  Phone CY-5-4309.

*
Calendar

Southwestern Jewish Press, August 6, 1954, Page 3

7th-Yomaco Beach Party –Mission Beach –8:30 p.m.
9th-Hadassah Membership Tea – 1:30
13th—Jewish War Veterans Aux. Poppy Sale
15th—Jewish Labor Committee Picnic – Pepper Grove – 12 noon
17th—Council of Jewish Women Membership Tea – 2345 Juan St.
21st – Y.J.C. Club Pot Luck Supper –Tifereth Israel Center – 8:00 p.m.
26th—Temple Beth Israel Semi-Annual Meeting
29th—Hebrew Home for the Aged Annual Meeting and Installation—2:00 p.m

*
Becomes Problem
Southwestern Jewish Press, August 6, 1954, Page 3

The man who insists on telling you all his troubles eventually becomes one of yours.

*
Double Talk
Southwestern Jewish Press, August 6, 1954, Page 4

By Janet & Susan Solof

Summertime is in full blast,
School times are in the past.
Just loads of fun for one and ll,
And getting ready for next fall.

The Kona Kai Club was taken over by the younger set for the purpose of celebrating David Gordon’s 7th birthday.  Taking it over were Mark Solomon, Barbi Addleson, Allan Breitbard, Jeffrey Hollander, Vickie and Terri Marsh, David Cohen, Steve Horrow, Richie Selton, John Ruden, Susan Kahn, Jim Krause.  Lunch and swimming made the party perfect. David agrees birthdays are wonderful.  Happy birthday.

Julian Frank ‘n Linda Douglas, Bernie Sosna ‘n Beverly Kitaen, Shearn Plann ‘n Lois Liff, Burt Sharpe ‘n Lucy Recht, Don Byrnes ‘n Jane Cohn, Don Kobernick ‘n Faggie Krasner, Joe Winicki ‘n Natalie Veitzer, were trying hard to keep the surprise of Herb Wenig’s party a secret. It was given by and at the home of Sharlene Stone.  Happy Birthday, Herb.

A “schmaltzy” party can best describe the fun everyone had at Paul Levine’s 8th birthday party. A large group of Paul’s friends helped make the celebration complete with many games, ice cream cake and favors.  This was the “moistest” part which is really the “bestest.”

Susie Hutler and Sandy Byrock were the hostesses at a terrific bar-b-que and dancing party. Everyone in the gang was there and everyone said “fun was floating around.” A wonderful time was had by all.

Handing out a good time to all her friends was Roslind Steffel when she gave a craz-zy party. All the kids joined in and had loads of fun.

Adrienne and Elliott Polland from Gary, Indiana, were entertained by their cousin Zena Fuerzieg at a get-together.  Those who rated it tops were Roger Brenes, Janice Klaskin, Gary Naiman, Susan Solof, David Levens, Shirley Kaufman, Sheldon Golden, Janet Solof, Gary Cantor and Zena.  Adrienne and Elliott agree that San Diego is a pretty terrific city.

Bye now from Yours Truly—CY05-0679.

*
Trooper Doopers

Southwestern Jewish Press, August 6, 1954, Page 4

Boy Scout Troop No. 99 meets at Tifereth Israel Synagogue at 7:30 p.m. every Monday night under the able leadership of Scoutmaster Reuben Aved. Boys 11 to 14 are invited to join and have a whale of a good time.

Troop 99 went out on an overnight camp=out over the 17th and 18th of July.  They pitched camp in pup tents in Torrey Pines, cooked their own meals, went swimming on Sunday and came home determined to do the following:

1.  Have a daylight hike on August 1st.

2.  Have another overnight campout August 22nd.

Come on, you would be Scouters, and find out how life is really worth living!

*
Del Mar Track Breaking Records
Southwestern Jewish Press, August 6, 1954, Page 4 

DEL MAR, Calif., August 6 –From a near record list of 15 nominations a field of at least a dozen top sprinters will trek postward here Saturday in the $10,000 added Bing Crosby Handicap at six furlongs as Del Mar Turf Club winds up its first full week of thoroughbred racing.

The Bing Crosby, named in honor of Del Mar’s founder and first president, has had eight previous runnings, and has been captured by such campaigners as Prevaricator, Cover Up, Blue Reading, Gustaf and Ode. Winner of this stake generally comes in for recognition as the spring champion of the 41-day meeting.

*
(Money Advice)
Southwestern Jewish Press, August 6, 1954, Page 4

Many people advise others to save money—but very few give advice on how to do it.

*
Lasker Lodge News
Southwestern Jewish Press, August 6, 1954, Page 4

By Lou Levitt

At the last regular meeting Dr. Milton Millman was unanimously elected to the post of second vice president.  Marshall Zucker announces the fall drive for new members is now under way.  One of the prizes being offered to a lucky winner who brings in new members will be a free trip to Las Vegas. This  is certainly something worth working for.

At the next meeting there will be the presentation of the Americanism Award to Millie Berman who recently figured in the San Diego hearings on Communism.  There will also be a report of the progress made at the convention in San Francisco.

*

Adventures in Jewish History” is sponsored by Inland Industries Group LP in memory of long-time San Diego Jewish community leader Marie (Mrs. Gabriel) Berg. Our “Adventures in San Diego Jewish History” series will be a regular feature until we run out of history.  To find stories on specific individuals or organizations, type their names in our search box.

Adventures In San Diego Jewish History, July 23, 1954, Part 2

June 28, 2010 Leave a comment

Compiled by San Diego Jewish World staff

Doris Jean Berman Weds Sydney Green Sunday

Southwestern Jewish News, July 23, 1954, page 3

The marriage of Doris Jean Berman, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Berman to Martin Sydney Green of Beverly Hills, son of MR. and Mrs. David Green of Beverly Hills and Palm Springs, will be solemnized by Rabbi Morton J. Cohn at 2:00 p.m., July 25 at the Manor Hotel. Theodore Nauman will be soloist. The candlelight ceremony will take place under a canopy of daisies and gardenias.

The bride’s original gown is of embroidered white Swiss organdy featuring a three tiered skirt with a slight train and a portrait neckline.  Her elbow length net veil is scalloped to match the gown and trimmed with pearls.  She will carry a bouquet of white roses and stephanotis. Her only jewelry will be her grandmother’s diamond earrings.

The bride’s attendants in gowns similar in design to the bride’s are of yellow Swiss organdy. They will carry baskets of yellow marguerite daisies, pink elf roses, baby’s breath and blue delphinium.

Charlotte Pearl is maid of honor with Mrs. Richard Berman, sister in law of the bride, acting as a matron of honor.  Bridesmaids are Della Rubin and Barbara LaRue Blakley.

Brother of the bride, Ralph Berman, is acting as best man with brother Richard Berman as lead usher.  Other ushers are Frank Parker of Westwood and Nick Linardos of Los Angeles.

A champagne reception for 200 guests will be held in the Terrace Room of the hotel immediately following the ceremony. The wedding table will be decorated with gardenias and maiden fern surrounding a four-tier column wedding cake.  Of particular interest are the candles which will burn in the gold candelabra at each end of the table.  They were used at the wedding of the bride’s parents, 32 years ago.

Mrs. Harry Berman will receive in pink beaded cotton lace and Mrs. David Green will weak aqua Irish linen with aqua and pink accessories.

When the new Mr. and Mrs. Berman leave for a two week wedding trip to an “undisclosed destination,” she will wear a beaded beige cashmere suit with brown lizard accessories and brown orchids.  Upon their return they will make their home at 442-D North Palm Drive, Beverly Hills.

*
Personal
Southwestern Jewish News, July 23, 1954, page 3

Lincoln Quiz – The Lincoln Quiz article in the last issue was of particular interest to George Grossmayer and its sister. Their father, Nathan Grossmayer, was a close friend of Lincoln.  Original correspondence from General U.S. Grant and other documents showing Mr. Grossmayer’s service to his country were turned over to the Hebrew Union College in Cincinnati.

*
We’re happy to welcome to San Diego newcomers including the Harry J. Karkovys and their daughter, formerly of Larchmont, N.Y., the George Swerdlows and their three children, formerly of Columbus, Ohio; and the Al Greasons and their two children of Rochester, N.Y.

*

Millie and Meyer Snyder have moved into their new home at 5134 Bocaw Place and are anxious to have their friends call.

*
Milton David (Mickey) Rosenberg, son of MR. and Mrs. Louis Rosenberg, a June graduate of the Boalt School of Law, University of California at Berkeley, has been elected to membership in COIF, the Law Honor Society.  A members of Sigma Alpha Mu Fraternity, Mickey will work as law research this summer on the campus.

*
Molly and Abe Sackheim wish to thank all their friends for their many kindnesses during Abe’s recent illness.

*
Travel Topics – Mr. and Mrs. George Wixen flew South this week for an eighteen day tour of Mexico with their daughter, Jackie, and Marcia Ruskin.  They expect to visit all the outstanding and interesting places including Mexico City and Acapulco.

*
“Our six years in San Diego will be years to remember. We enjoyed our participation in the community’s activities, our social contacts, and our affiliation with the Temple.” Thus did Libby and Albert Krasnow express themselves before they left for their new home at 99 Brewster Road, West Hartford, Conn.  Their San Diego relatives and friends expect the Krasnows to spend many vacations here in the future. Good luck and good health.

*
Sioux Falls seemed far away to Linda Ackerman as she sang duets with Karen Mallen, one of her close San Diego friends.  Flo Ackerman is staying close to her first grandson, Jeffrey, and stretching out her stay here as long as possible.

*
Visiting for 10 days from Detroit are Rabbi Morton J. Cohn’s brother and family, Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Cohn, their four daughters and a son, and Mrs. Cohn’s father, Mr.  Sam Shapero.  The Cohns motored cross country and are staying at the Manor Hotel.

*
Estelle and Ben Rottman (Ben is President of the Civic Music Association) are attending the Bach Music Festival in Carmel, California.  While there, they will visit with Julian Karolyi, pianist, who will be one of the guest soloists at the Festival.  Mr. Karolyi is also slated to give a concert in san Diego with the Summer Symphony on July 27th.

*
Mr. and Mrs. James Lesser and their three daughters have just returned from a visit to New York. Their seventeen year old nephew, Kenneth Kadet, returned with them to spend his summer vacation in San Diego.

The Lessers, who motored East, chose routes which enabled them to visit State Parks and historic locales.  They had a grand reunion with members of both sides of the fmily. While in New York, Mrs. Lesser celebrated her birthday and the 48th Wedding Anniversary of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. A, Kadet.

*
Hadassah Sets Tea For Members Aug. 9
Southwestern Jewish News, July 23, 1954, page 3

Hadassah will launch its 1954-55 Membership Tea on August 9, at the Kona Kai Club from 1:30 to 4:00.  Mrs. Harry Felson, newly elected president, cordially invites all non-Hadassah members to be the organization’s guest on that day.  Present members are also warmly welcome and will receive invitations at a nominal charge of $1.55.

Mrs. Edward Kitaen, membership chairman, assisted by Mrs. Manuel Hafner, co-chairman, will preside at the Tea at which time a fashion show will be presented based on a “Holiday in Hawaii.”

Assisting Mrs. Kitaen in planning the unusual event will be Mmes. Elmer Wohl, Rod Horrow, Howard Hoffman, Archie Bushnell, George Wixen, Robert W. Smith, Earl Brody, Arthur Gardner, Sig Stein, Louis Steinman and Manuel Hafner.

Admittance to the Tea will be by invitation only and should be made with Mrs. Edward Kitaen, HO-9-1389, and Mrs. Manuel Hafner, AC-2-3876.

*
(Future Past)

The more tasks we leave for tomorrow the quicker the future becomes the past.
*
Cradle
Southwestern Jewish News, July 23, 1954, page 3

Judy Sharon, aged three, has a live baby doll now that brother Lawrence Marc has joined the Jerome Schwartz family.  Lawrence was born July 9 and weighted 7 lbs, 11 oz.

Paternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. David Schwartz; maternal grandmother, Mrs. Ethel Schlossberg.  Great grandmother is Mrs. Betsy Solomon.  Rabbi Morton J. Cohn officiated at the brith on Sunday, July 18.

*
Mr. and Mrs. Sheldon Sackheim (JoAnne Rosenfeld) welcomed their first child, a daughter, Janet Lynn on July 15.

The 7 lb. 1 oz young miss is the second grandchild for Mr. and Mrs. Ted Rosenfeld and the third for Mr. and Ms. Abe Sackheim.

*
Classified
Southwestern Jewish News, July 23, 1954, page 3

Room for Rent – Gentleman or lady; quiet, light, clean, airy room; kitchen privileges; garage and use of telephone.  Near Bus No. 2.  Phone BE-4-5624 evenings.

*
Room for Rent for lady, in very nice private ho9me. Cooking privileges, ½ block from bus. Call before 11:00 a.m. or after 6:00 p.m. AT-4-6586.

*
For Sale, House, Loma Portal, 3 bedrooms.  Priced to sell with excellent terms.  AC-3-0635.

*
Calendar

Southwestern Jewish News, July 23, 1954, page 3

July
25th—Yo-Ma-Co Picnic –Alpine Park
25th—Tifereth Israel Mens’ Club Boat Ride – 5:30 p.m.
31st—Young Jewish Couples Club Beach Picnic – Pacific Beach –8:30 p.m.

August
1st—Pioneer Women, Negba Picnic –Pepper Grove.
4th—Beth Israel Sisterhood “Summer Tea” – 4290 Altamirano Way.
9th-Hadassah Membership Tea –1:30 p.m
13th—Jewish War Veterans Aux. Poppy Sale.
15th – Jewish Labor Committee—Pepper Grove – 12 Noon.

*
They Never Learn—{Editorial}
Southwestern Jewish News, July 23, 1954, page 4

Jew-baiting has already moved into the Oregon political campaign—although election day is still more than three months away.  The intended victim was Richard L. Neuberger, whose byline is nationally known to magazine readers.  Neuberger is one of the best known writers on the Northwest.  He is also a member of the Oregon Senate and his wife Maurine serves in the state’s House of Representatives, a unique family distinction.

Neuberger is a Jew.  He is one of the strongest vote-getters in the state. The Democrats have nominated him to run against Guy Cordon, who is seeking re-election to the U.S. Senate. The Sherman County Journals (published by State Senator Giles French) considered this “ a bad decision”  It ran an editorial that began:

“Up until last week Richard Neuberger had been wise enough to remain primarily a writer and to dabble in politics as a recreation or to provide grist for writing mill. The well-known wisdom of his race in financial matters has been uppermost in this policy.”

The Cordon-for-Senator Committee promptly circulated this item throughout the state with the intention that it be reprinted in other papers. Instead, those editors who did comment, decried the unwholesome smear.  Senator Cordon’s campaign manager denied any knowledge of the incident, blaming it on a publicity man whom he has since removed from the campaign. But he agreed that the wholesale circulation of the editorial was an effort to use religious prejudice.

Medals and Arms
{Editorial}
Southwestern Jewish News, July 23, 1954, page 4

The Legion of Merit Award, given by our State Dept., to an Arab General who fought on the side of the Nazis and later against Israel, is in line with the recent decisions of our government to arm Iraq.  Iraq has done more than any other Arab nation to aid the Nazis, to persecute its Jewish inhabitants, to introduce anti-Jewish propaganda into the United States and to avoid an armistice with Israel.

Yet, this Arab State was selected by Secretary of State Dulles as the first to receive free arms.  The Arab general, who joined the Nazis when the Allies seemed on the brink of defeat, has been chosen as the first Arab League officer to be decorated with a U.S. medal. This gesture was made with the approval of the White House “in line with the defense of the vital resources of the free world.” (Oil?)

Hundreds of Jews are still in Iraqi concentration camps. About 125,000 Iraq Jews escaped into Israel since 1949.  The State Department views Iraq as a “bastion of democracy,” although the Iraqi government openly admitted it wants U.S. arms to kill Jews rather than any Soviet invaders.  Israel has applications for similar arms aid but it has been ignored for two years.

Our State Department is playing directly into Communist hands by honoring and backing an unreliable and Nazi-minded Arab State. America can never be sure of the Arabs, who have twice proved to be untrustworthy. 

Consideration of Israel’s requests would help build and sustain a truly “democratic minded” nation, that is oriented toward the free world, and whose people fought on the side of the Allies during the last war. Our State Department could do worse than pin a medal on an Israeli general and send arms to Israel.

*
Jews In American History—300 Years
Southwestern Jewish News, July 23, 1954, page 4

By Dr. Philip L. Seaman, University of Judaism

In previous chapters reference has already been made to Solomon Nunes Carvalho, an artist who accompanied John Charles Fremont on his last and ill fated expedition to the far west in 1853.  This reference was made when we discussed the pioneer Jews of Utah.  However there are instances in the life and service of Carvalho that should be given additional attention.  These facts we also learn from Schappes Documentary History of the United States and other sources.

Carvalho was one of a family of rabbis, teachers, writers and merchants of Spanish-Portuguese descent.  He was born in Charleston, South Carolina in 1815 and died in New York City in 1894.  We learn from Dr. Walters’ story of the Pioneer Jews of Utah in the Studies in American Jewish History published by the American Jewish Historical Society that at the age of twenty, he had already achieved a considerable reputation as a portrait painter. Among his best known portraits are those of Thomas Hunter, the founder of Hunter College in New York City and of the Reverend Isaac Lesser of Philadelphia, and that two of his paintings were hung in the interior of the old synagogue in Charleston.

Two of Carvalho’s sons attained distinction in other fields. David Nunes Carvalho was a celebrated handwriting expert whose book Forty Centuries of Ink is a recognized and authoritative work on the detection of forgeries.  His disclosures, Dr. Walters tells us, of the falsity of the documents employed in the conviction of Alfred Dreyfus in France are said to have materially aided in Dreyfus final vindication.

Solomon Nunes Carvalho, when in Utah, was supplied with painting materials and painted the portraits of a number of Mormon dignitaries. He received a good deal of attention from Brigham Young, the Mormon Governor.  He tells us in his journal that he went to a meeting where Apostle Benson preached a sermon on the restoration of Israel to Jerusalem “which would have done honor to a speaker of Hebrew persuasion.”

An interesting observation is made by Anita Libman Lebson in her Pilgrim People when she tells the story of Carvalho.  “There was little what escape the artist’s eye… He found possibilities for industrial development and for colonization.  From San Bernardino to Los Angeles the road lay over one continuous field of wild mustard, covering the whole breath of the valley.  Not a bad idea, he suggested to build a mustard mill.”

In Carvalho’s diary he notes the manners and customs of the Mormons, discusses their vagaries and shows the manifest unfairness of their system to women.  The crudeness of the new communities in California, the lack of morals, the abandonment of all customary restraints, etc.  The San Francisco area was the cesspool of California immorality.  “Alas! For the morals of the people at large… almost every night while I was there, one murder at least was committed.”  In Los Angeles he found opportunity to put his organization ability to work.  He promoted a Hebrew Philanthropic Society.

Carvalho, who made a ‘long journey cross the continent that led to unravelling its mysteries finally returned to his wife and his children in Baltimore and Philadelphia, where he and his wife were active in communal life. (To be continued).

*
From Where I Sit
Southwestern Jewish News, July 23, 1954, pages 4, 8

By Mel Goldberg

Startling fashion news: … Paris and New York papers please note! … At a recent San Diego wedding, a gay female turned up as a guest during the ceremony in the House of Worship, adorned in what can best be described as a strapless candy-striped T.-shirt. We later conducted a survey at a local department store and were duly informed that the proper nomenclature of the item is an elasticized sun-top.

A hasty interrogation of a store clerk revealed this particular piece of ladies apparel is considered most becoming at a beach or in a patio…. When this reporter asked the saleslady if it might be considered an appropriate item to wear when attending a wedding, she responded with complete dismay—“are you kidding?”

We might add that the lady who wore this  dramatic piece of apparel, further added to the display by criticizing in a stage whisper—(throughout the ceremony)—the outfits worn by the more staid and sensible other lady guests present! … If this keeps up we shall attend all summer weddings in a pair of cool, comfortable B.V.Ds.

The Mexico Travel Service buzzed us last week about the non-stop DC-6 flight from Tijuana to Mexico City … We took a quick gander at this luxury 5-hour flight plane and it was really something. … On the flight, you get cold beer, card games, sandwiches, canapes, refreshments, hot meals, newspapers, coffee and magazines … One wonders how it is possible to use up all the free services in five hours.

As we inspected the plane, we kept thinking of the differences between heading for a vacation in transportation like this as against the limousine service from New York to the Catskill Mountains. … Boy oh boy, those old limousines were something … You’d either leave at 6 a/m. or in the middle of the afternoon heat. … The cars were built to carry 7 passengers, but the driver always managed to squeeze in a couple of extra fares and enough luggage for 2 weeks.  This trip was always referred to as “going to the mountains by machine.” … (As a matter of fact, we recall any number of older folks who never referred to an automobile in any other way than “by machine.” … It was a case of “the children are motoring to Miami by machine,”  or “My son, the doctor, has a big practice, he has two machines.” …) On the limousine trip, the passenger always carried vast assortments of food.

Twenty minutes enroute and the grub parcels were opened… hard boiled eggs made an appearance … who’d think of taking a trip without hard boiled eggs? … Next a chicken polkie .. this was the “fight” signal for the younger passengers … To them, there were no edible parts of a chicken other than the legs … and what a howl they’d put up if they didn’t get to nosh on one of them. … The whole two or three hour ride was a continuous pattern of eating, feeling nauseous, and making countless “rest” stops.

Soneone once heard of a driver who started out with a car full of passengers on the hottest day of summer… Because of the cleaners’ strike, the chauffeur was wearing his only available suit, a heavy wool, itchy tweed number … On that particular day, one of the passengers spilled a bottle of herring in sour cream over the entire back seat, a seven-year-old boy, while eating a half-melted Hershey bar, broke the cranks off the rear windows so that they could not be opened – another passenger was suffering from an attack of intestinal flu combined with a champagne hangover, one small child had the colic, but why go on?….

The point of the story is: the driver arrived at the resort, with a crazed look in his eyes and with just one quiet little passenger… When the circumstances surrounding the case were explained to the court, the jury refused to convict….

The resorts, according to the advertisements, were sensational … The copy-writers stretched their imagination to the breaking point … “Catering to the Discriminating,” “The Last Word in Summer Vaation Luxury,” “Another World,” “Exquisite Cuisine.” … They certainly could toss the adjectives around … We recall one which for purpose of identification, we’ll call Shapiro’s Hawaiian Hacienda.  What a dump! …

The “ad” emphasized recreational facilities … the golf course was 18 miles down the road … the tennis court would have  been terrific if it had a net and if the toadstools growing all over the serving line didn’t trip you up … the rates were always different than what the reservation stated. … This joint featured Broadway entertainment… It was Broadway entertainment all right! .. Broadway in Weekawken, New Jersey… Shapiro was quite a guy… Because of him, we now have labor laws.

He used to recruit college students in the spring-time and lure them with the opportunity of a “vacation with a chance to make some spending money” … What a vacation!  … Work in the kitchen from 5:30 to 7:00 ayem, then wait on tables for breakfast till 11.  Take a half hour vacation! Back to work from noon till 3, waiting on the lunch trade. Take fifteen minute vacation! 3:15 to 5:30 serve the tea and cocktail customers  5:30 to 9:30 wait on the dinner customers.  Help clean up the kitchen and dining room, then play in the orchestra, or dance with the customers and keep ‘em happy till one in the morning.  Pretty good deal.  Besides all this, you get paid $20.00 a month.  … The customers that the college boys had to dance with could have been entered in a race at Caliente—Real dolls—better looking heads you could find on cabbage.

The only way you could beat Shapiro at his own game was to rent a room on the American plan and eat like a horse … One guest checked in and had a midnight snack of three chicken sandwiches and two bottles of ginger ale … For breakfast he ordered tomato and orange juice six eggs, some salami, oatmeal, three bagels and two cups of coffee.  When the waiter asked him if that was his entire order, he said, “Of course not, that for mine large intestine.  Now for me, bring some pancakes and a strawberry waffle and a pitcher of grapefruit juice.”

At noon time, this same chap ate 14 potato blintzes, 9 cheese blintzes, 3 large Idaho baked potatoes, 2 bowls of cottage cheese with chopped vegetables and sour cream.  He topped this off with two bowls of chicken soup and a bowl of borscht… At two in the afternoon, while having a mid-afternoon snack of sturgeon sandwiches, he suffered an attack of acute indigestion and passed out … Shapiro and a few well meaning guests hovered over him with a glass of cold spring water, trying to revive him…. At he came to, he spotted Shapiro with the glass of water and commented: “Shapiro: What is this nonsense with the water! Bring me two malted milks!” …
  


*
“Adventures in Jewish History” is sponsored by Inland Industries Group LP in memory of long-time San Diego Jewish community leader Marie (Mrs. Gabriel) Berg. Our indexed “Adventures in San Diego Jewish History” series will be a regular feature until we run out of history. 

Adventures in San Diego Jewish History, July 9, 1954, Part 2

June 23, 2010 Leave a comment

Compiled by San Diego Jewish World staff

Double Talk
Southwestern Jewish Press, July 9, 1954, Page 3

By Janet and Susan Solof

We hope you are having a wonderful vacation,
With fun and parties and plenty of relaxation

Yiddish Yak – The kids sure had fun at Roberta Wyloge’s terrific sweet sixteen party.  Dancing, refreshments and mainly fun were a full blast. All of Roberta’s friends enjoyed the wonderful party. Best wishes on your 16th birthday.

Skating, sliding, falling into being a “man” was Alan Douglas who celebrated his Bar Mitzvah and birthday with a fabulous roller skating party.  Skating alongside of Alan was all his gang. They had a gliding good time.  Many more happy birthdays, Alan.

Celebrating the 4th of July with a  “cool” party given by Jack Sharpe were all the kids. A bar-be-cue and dancing came before the fireworks.  This was really celebrating.

Glimpsed milling and mingling with the crowd at the San Diego County Fair were Alvin Cohen, Debbie Strauss, Art Pogrell, Larry Zlotoff, Ruth Moskowitz, Jack Sharpe, Mort Cohn, Joan Breitbard, Larry Cantor, Gordon Levitt, Lucy Recht, Lawrence Schiller, Sheldon Golden, Janet and Susan Solof, Sharlene Stone, Herb Wenig, Phyliss Mollick, Harvey Cohen, Eileen Rivers, Paul Rosenthal, Linda Douglas, Philip Kaplan, Gary and Eddy Naiman.

Bye now –CY 5-0679.

*
In Appreciation
Southwestern Jewish Press, July 9, 1954, Page 3

Mrs. Anna Fagelson and son, Roy, and family; Mr. and Mrs. Irving Fagelson and family; and Mrs. Niel Himmel wish to thank all their friends for their kindness and sympathy during their recent bereavement.

Mrs. Himmel is convalescing at home after hospitalization.

*
Jewish Center News
Southwestern Jewish Press, July 9, 1954, Page 3

Women’s League – There will be an open meeting for members of the Jewish Community Center Women’s League on Thursday, July 22nd—1 p.m. at the Jewish Community Center, 3227 El Cajon Blvd.  Plans for the coming year’s activities will be presented and all Jewish Community Center women members are invited to participate.

Teen-agers Attention!—Monday evening, July 12th—7:30 p.m. will be the beginning of a special summer program for Jr. Hi School boys and girls. Activities will include outings, beach parties, dressy parties, dances, refreshments in addition to the lounge activities.  Monday night is the oly night of scheduled activities at the Center for Jr. High School boys and girls.

Thursday evening beginning July 15, 7:30 p.m. is for High School and college students only.  Special activities will be programmed by the group.

Please remember to come to the Center on the night of your age group.  Membership cards will be checked at the door and ineligible youngsters will be denied admission.

Baseball—All ambitious frustrated ball players are invited to participate in playing baseball Sunday mornings.  Call the Center office for further information.

Center Donations – we wish to express our appreciation to the San Diego Lasker Lodge of B’nai B’rith; Temple Beth Israel Sisterhood; and Yo-Ma-Co for their contributions to the Camp Jaycee Scholarship Fund. These contributions are assisting youngsters to participate in camp activities to participate in camp activities who wouldn’t have been able to do so because of family financial difficulties. Thank you again.

We gratefully acknowledge receipt of office equipment gifts from Morrie Douglas, Maurie Novak and Henry Price.

*
Esther Weitzman-Andrew Segal Joined In Candlelight Rites
Southwestern Jewish Press, July 9, 1954, Page 4

S. Esther Weitzman, daughter of Mr. and MRs. Harry R. Weitzman, will become the bride of Andrew Segal, son of Mrs. Helen Segal and Morris Segal of Far Rockaway, N.Y., at a candlelight ceremony in Tifereth Israel Synagogue on Sunday, July 11, at 5:00 p.m.  Rabbi Monroe Levens will perform the wedding ceremony.

The bride’s waltz-length gown will be of nylon tulle and lace and will feature a scalloped portrait neckline and lace appliquéd full skirt.  The illusion veil will be caught to a tiara of lace and red pearls. She will carry a white Bible bedecked with a white orchid and stephanotis.

Sonia Joyce Weitzman will be her sister’s maid of honor and is wearing a gown of white tulle and lace over pink taffeta. Mrs. William Schwartz is matron of honor and will be gowned in white and pink. Brides-maids Mrs. Lawrence Siegel, Mrs. Ralph Jacobs, and Charlotte Pearl are wearing nylon dotted swiss in blue, yellow and lilac. Marjorie Lowitz and Kay Prager will act as candle-lighers, flower girls are Andrea Press and Linda Thaler, and ring bearer is Darrell Cohen.

Arnold Segal will act has his brother’s best man.  Ushers are Seymour Segal, brother of the groom, Leon Charney, Ben Press and Earnest Hine.

Over 300 guests have been invited to the dinner and reception to be held at Beth Jacob Center immediately following the wedding. The bride’s mother will receive in sky blue lace over taffeta and the groom’s mother will wear pink lace over taffeta.  Mrs. Milton Rochman is in charge of the guest book.

After a 3-week honeymoon covering San  Francisco, Lake Tahoe, Yosemite, Carmel and Sequoia, the newlyweds will make their home at 5805 Andros Ct.

The bride is a graduate of UCLA and is now teaching school in Santee. She is a member of Sigma Alpha Iota, professional music fraternity for women.  The groom is a CCNY graduate and is affiliated with Pi Tau Sigma, engineering fraternity.

Out of town guests from San Bernardino are Mr. and Mrs. Hyman Weitzman, MR. and Mrs. Rusty Leidner; from Los Angeles are Mr. and MRs. Leon Weitzman, MR. and Mrs. Jack Weitzman, Mrs. S.G. Finn, Mr. and Mrs. Paul Twedt, Misses Rochelle Feinberg and Fern Osman, and Mr. Abe Kuscher. From Venice, Calif., are Mr. and Mrs. Joe Dobin; Lillian Shapiro of New York will attend with the groom’s mother and brothers.

*

Personals
Southwestern Jewish Press, July 9, 1954, Page 4

While their San Diego friends will miss them, they wish Dr. and Mrs. Harry Kaufman the best of luck on their move to Hollywood. The Kaufmans will be living at 1427 N. Laurel Ave.
*
Cantor and Mrs. Joseph Cysner wish to thank all their friends for their good wishes on the birth of their second daughter.
*
This is not San Diego’s month. The community is sorry to lose the S.Z. Greenbergs to El Centro and the Lou Mogys to Los Angeles.

*
There were at least two good reasons for the recent patio supper at the Sid Goldsteins. The Sarfans, Chemnicks and Kantors were all there to congratulate Ellen Goldstein on her graduation from Berkeley, and also wish her a Bon Voyage for her European Study-Travel Tour.  Ellen expects to stay on in Europe to participate in the Work Camp Movement sponsored by the International Service Bureau in Paris.  Some of the countries she expects to visit are England, France, Italy and Holland.
*
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Apelman celebrated their 35th wedding anniversary by serving refreshments at the July 7 meeting of San Diego Post 185.  Mr. Harry Apelman is a Past Department Commander and Past Post Commander. Mr. Apelman is a Past Auxiliary President.

*

Travel Topics 
Southwestern Jewish Press, July 9, 1954, Page 4

Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Nathan are leaving July 12 to visit relatives in Kenosha, Waukegan and Chicago prior to their New York sailing August 6 on the USS United States. They will visit England, France, Belgium, Holland, Italy, Greece and will spend the High Holy days in Israel.  The Nathans will sail for home in October on the Ile de France.

*
The exciting town of San Francisco has made conquests of Dr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Kwint. They spent four days in the Northern City while Dr. Joe attended the National Convention of the American Medical Association. Since they averaged on 5 hours sleep a night, it’s a cinch they did more than attend meetings.

Before returning home they stopped in Las Vegas for four days where they ran into the Harold Lashers, George Starrs and the Morrie Krauses—and didn ‘t catch up on any lost sleep.

*

Jack and Sarah Wyner left last Friday for a two-week motor trip up the coast. Tnhey hnope to cover territory all the way up to Canada. … The Mack Estersons have returned from a few days at Arrowhead Springs. It must be a busy place –as Ruth and Mack left, the Dr. John Bloomenthals were arriving … Mike Soule left last week with friends for a two week motor trip to Guadalajara and Mexico City … Belle Demsey had as one day guests her brother and sister-in-law of Cleveland.
*
Mrs Al Neumann has as her house guest her niece, Marilyn Fladel of Brooklyn, N.Y.  Miss Fladel will spend about three weeks on the coast.
*
Joyce and Daniel Cohen and small son, Eric, of Inglewood were in San Diego last week visiting grandfather and great-grandfather, Samuel Tokman and Mrs. Tokman, before enplaning for Chicago, a University of Illinois reunion, and a summer of supervising children’s camps in Michiana, Mich.
*
There is always room for one more with Lillian Miller. She left Wednesday, via Super Chief, for a month vacation in the East with her four children and Myrna Wosk. The children will receive plenty of attention from both their paternal and maternal grandparents when they arrive in Boston. They plan to stay with Mrs. Miller’s parents, Dr. and Mrs. Louis Victor.  Myrna Wosk will visit relatives in New York. We wonder how Dr. David Miller will stand the quiet in his home.

*
Classified
Southwestern Jewish Press, July 9, 1954, Page 4

NURSE—8-hour, adult case.  Baby sitting nites.  BE-3-5996.

FOR SALE, House.  Loma Portal, 3 bedrooms.  Priced to sell with excellent terms.  AC-3-0625.

*
Calendar
Southwestern Jewish Press, July 9, 1954, Page 4

11th—Yo-Ma-Co Installation Dinner Dance
12th—B’nai B’rith Girls Card Party Luncheon – Temple Center – 12 noon.
18th—City of Hope Aux. Annual Picnic – Pepper Grove.
25th—Yo-Ma-Co Picnic—Alpine Park.

*
B.B. Girls Set Luncheon
Southwestern Jewish Press, July 9, 1954, Page 4

The San Diego Chapter of B’nai B’rith Girls is presenting a Card Party-Luncheon at the Temple Center on July 12 at 12 noon.

The girls themselves are preparing the lunch which will be followed by card games.

*
“Adventures in Jewish History” is sponsored by Inland Industries Group LP in memory of long-time San Diego Jewish community leader Marie (Mrs. Gabriel) Berg. Our indexed “Adventures in San Diego Jewish History” series will be a regular feature until we run out of history. 

San Diego’s historic places: Montgomery Field as recalled by aviation pioneer Bill Gibbs

June 22, 2010 3 comments
 
 
 

Bill Gibbs on June 18, 2010 visits the air field he founded in 1937. Behind him is a T-shaped hangar for small aircraft

By Donald H. Harrison

Donald H. Harrison

SAN DIEGO—Bill Gibbs has been watching the calendar as closely as he used to monitor the instrument panels of his airplanes.  Come October 6, the San Diego aviation pioneer will turn 100 years old, and Gibbs is counting the days.  He had big celebrations with his aviation buddies on his 80th and 90th birthdays and figures to do the same for his centennial. 

Before Gibbs purchased 25 acres in 1937 for $10 per acre, the Kearny Mesa area, then just outside the San Diego city limits, was “nothing but jackrabbits, coyotes and rattle snakes,”  Gibbs recently recalled.  He paid $50 down and $25 every three months.

The reason he picked that particular stretch of land, he said, was because it was on a mesa, and therefore less likely to be flooded than areas lying at lower elevations.  Water at least two feet high had previously flooded his hangar at the now defunct National City Airport after the Sweetwater River overflowed its banks. 

Among the numerous jobs Gibbs had filled in his early life was working at a service station operated by Carlysle Madson at 14th and National Avenue.  Madson’s real love was teaching flying, and when he would give a lesson, he would leave Gibbs to watch the station, paying the boy 25 cents per hour.   Gibbs didn’t take the aggregated pay in money, he took it in flying lessons.  Eventually, Gibbs became so good piloting Madson’s single engine tandem two-seater plane, that he became a co-owner with Madson of one airplane.

During the 1935 California-Pacific Exposition, Gibbs flew passengers around Balboa Park in a three-seater bi-plane. Flights could be either for seven or 15 minutes.

Although Gibbs thought he’d start his new landing strip with a partner, his excursion into the real estate business ended being a solo affair.  He borrowed $250 from the Bank of Italy—today known as the Bank of America– to purchase $500 Taylor Cub, the rest which he paid off with the proceeds from flying lessons.  By hand, he hacked brush from a pathway that he turned into an 1,100-foot landing strip.  After smacking himself with an axe, he decided that he should get help from professionals, and contracted with George Daley of Daley Construction to carve out two 2,900-foot runways, and one 1,200 feet.  All of them were 100-feet wide.  In what can be appreciated as an act of charity,  Daley charged Gibbs only $675 for the job, and allowed him to pay it off at the rate of $25 per month.

To pay his debts, Gibbs offered seven minute rides for 75 cent and half-hour sightseeing tours of San Diego for $2.  Another income stream was teaching would-be pilots how to fly.  Among his first students were Charlie Faust, who later in life would be the naturalist and architect who designed portions of San Diego’s famous Wild Animal Park, and James Dalby, who after serving as a flight instructor during World War II, then flying DC3′s for China National Airways and other airlines and owning a retail sales business, would go on to become president and general manager of Gibbs Aircraft Service Center.

Like his mentor Madson, Gibbs had another job to support his flying habit.  He worked since 1933 as a janitor for the Aztec Brewery Company in the wee hours of the morning, cleaning floors and greasing machinery.  Afterwards, he would go to his landing strip to wait for customers, catching up on sleep in those hours when none came.

Not long after Daley’s crews had done their work on the field, Gibbs was approached by a chief pilot for  T. Claude Ryan of Ryan School of Aeronautics.  A small auxiliary airport near Mission Bay had flooded, and Ryan needed an auxiliary landing field for a class of 75 Army Air Corps cadets to learn how to fly Ryan-built planes.

The pilot wanted to know what Gibbs would charge.  “Tell you what,” Gibbs said he replied.  “I’ll fix it up so you can drag it – send out a truck with two guys and as you go along, pick up all this brush and stone, and drag the place down, and you can use it for nothing.”

By 1940, Ryan had decided to use both Gibbs Field and the Mission Bay auxiliary field. He asked to rent the facility on a more formal basis.  The company also offered Gibbs a position teaching the cadets how to fly, enabling him to quit the brewery and to devote full time to his aviation career.

That was not the only connection to Ryan Aerospace, Gibbs said. He met his wife, Barbara, who worked as a secretary for  Ryan School of Aeronautics.  Barbara’s father,  Eddie Molloy, also worked for Ryan.  “He was the plant manager for Ryan.  Her father went to work for Ryan in 1940, a self-made aeronautical engineer.  He finally became vice president of Ryan.”  

By the time World War II started, with the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor, “I think had seven or eight planes,” Gibbs recalled.  Most of them were Luscombes, which “were all-metal airplanes except for the fabric on the wings.  They seated two, side by side.”  

Gibbs said Luscombes required most pilots to adjust the way they were used to flying.  In tandem two seaters—with the passenger sitting in a rear seat directly behind the pilot—the nose of the airplane was positioned directly in front of the pilot.  But when the pilot and passenger sat beside each other, it was located between them.  That required some re-orienting as pilots executed turns in the sky.

Once the war began, civilian flights were forbidden within a certain distance of the coast.  So Ryan, Gibbs and the entire operation moved to an airfield in Tucson, Arizona, for the duration of the war.  

Gibbs returned to his field in 1945, and soon was providing flying lessons to returning veterans seeking new careers in aviation.   As post World War II San Diego expanded, the city decided it wanted to take over Gibbs Field, paying the aviator $100,000 for the land and another $12,000 for the improvements.  The City also gave Gibbs a 20-year-lease with two 10-year-renewal periods.  That guaranteed Gibbs Flying Service would have a home for at least 40 years.

Not all the “$10 land” that Gibbs purchased originally was included in the deal. He combined a portion of that land with more expensive land he had purchased subsequently, and sold 209 acres east of then Highway 395 to the City of San Diego for its airport.  “I got $60,000 for the land and $48,000 for the improvements.”  

Gibbs sold another swath of land to the State of California for Highway 163, but retained approximately 55 acres in the vicinity of present day Convoy Street between Aero Drive and Kearny Mesa Road, some of which  is rented today by a variety of businesses.   What once cost $10 per acre, Gibbs estimated, today is worth approximately $1.5 million for the same acre.

Gibbs recalled that the name “Montgomery Field” was urged by then future Congressman Bob Wilson, who was a heavy hitter in the local Republican party.  Wilson was impressed that John J. Montgomery, the man reputed to have made the first controlled flight had done so in San Diego, way back in 1883.

The business continued to grow, with Gibbs eventually not only operating a flying school, but also providing 180 tie-downs spots on the apron and 80 “T” hangars for private planes.  The hangars are described by the alphabet letter because two shallow side compartments are built for the airplane’s wings, while the main part of the hangar houses the fuselage.   Contructing metal hangars in this fashion, Gibbs explained, enables the nesting of airplanes, with the fuselage of one backing up to the wing of another.  Gibbs also provided fueling, maintenance and repairs for private airplanes that landed at Montgomery Field. 

It was not unusual for former students to drop in on Gibbs years later, and to tell him their stories.  One fellow, who had been piloting a B-24 Liberator during World War II, told of his plane being shot up pretty bad, with some crew members wounded and various other problems creating panic.   The man told him that he remembered advice that Gibbs had given him about what to do in an emergency: “Just fly the plane,” and that’s what he concentrated on, despite the pandemonium all around him.  Keeping calm in that situation may well have saved the lives of everyone aboard, he said. “Stay focused” was Gibbs’ maxim.

Gibbs and his pilots flew a daily service for the Bank of America, picking up checks and inter-brsnch mail  at bank branches in more than 20 cities and bringing them to central West Coast computer centers for processing.  He used 16 twin-engines airplanes in the operation.

At this point in the interview, Gibbs withdrew a Bank of America credit card from his wallet and pointed to where it identified him as a customer since …. 1933.   He laughed, saying that when Bank of America employees meet someone who has been a customer for 67 years, they often express astonishment.  That’s one of the perks of being just a few months shy of a century old.

Gibbs Flying Service also developed an expertise in flying to Baja California and the West Coast of mainland Mexico  flying tourists, prospectors and geologists to their chosen destinations, and sometimes delivering supplies and conducting mercy flights.

Gibbs recalled that a company called National Bulk Carriers chartered one of his planes for what was intended to be a three-day visit to examine salt flats near Guerrero Negro and staying nights at Bahia de Los Angeles.   A chabasco—a tropical storm that came inland from the Pacific Ocean—formed two thunder clouds around the plane, and the downdraft from those thunder clouds pushed it down to the ground.  The plane hit the ground, spun around 135 degrees, moved backwards 35 feet from the force ofthe wind, and then started to burn.  Pilot Pete Larson and three passengrs might have survived if the airplane had ot caught fire, Gibbs speculated.  It took an aerial search party, which at times consisted of 27 airplanes, twelve days to find the wreckage and what remained of the four men’s bodies.

Flying up to Long Beach, where National Bulk Carriers’ president was visiting a ship’s chandler, Gibbs reported what had happened.  The owner  said that a friend in the oil industry had a heart attack, and that he had purchased his airplane among other assets of the business. The airplane was stored in a hangar in Texas.  Gibbs followed up, obtained the aircraft,  and an ongoing relationship with National Bulk Carriers was established. 

As the company’s crews continued to survey the salt flats in Baja California, they occasionally needed to purchase such supplies as a 15-foot boat in the United States.  Because National Bulk Carriers was not known in San Diego, local vendors declined to sell the boat unless cash was paid at the time of purchase.  Gibbs asked if they would be willing to send an invoice to the company if Gibbs, himself, guaranteed the payment.  Yes, the vendors said, because they had been doing business with Gibbs for a long time.

When the invoice reached National Bulk Carriers, it created quite a commotion.  Who was this fellow out on the West Coast guaranteeing invoices for them?  Didn’t the people in San Diego have any idea that the man who owned National Bulk Carriers paid his own way?  The owner’s name was D.K. Ludwig.  He owned a fleet of ships, a large Japanese shipyard, and other businesses.  At the time, he was one of the wealthiest men in the world.  When Ludwig’s comptroller called Gibbs to inquire about the strange turn of affairs in which the small business owner was guaranteeing the credit of a multi-millionaire industrialist, Gibbs apologetically explained that the San Diego vendors meant no disrespect, they just hadn’t heard of Ludwig’s company. 

Although Ludwig’s pride may have been wounded, he ultimately took it in good grace, sending bigger and bigger cash advances to Gibbs to act as his agent.  Eventually, Gibbs said,  it was not uncommon for Ludwig to send him $50,000 cash advances from which to draw expenses.

Bill Gibbs, seated, and son Buzz Gibbs examine photo display on Montgomer Field's history

Years later, Gibbs got out of the aircraft operations business, selling all 51 airplanes,  preferring instead to rent space to airplanes that needed homes on the ground.  His son, Buzz Gibbs, who now heads the business, related that the 1960s through the 1980s were a golden time for the general aviation business.  “There were three major manufacturers; Cessna, Beech and Piper,” the son recalled.  “Cessna was the biggest: in 1978, they made $10,000 airplanes.  In 1985, they quit making piston airplanes.  That was like General Motors not making cars, and so it has been in a general decline since then.  So the small airplane business is decreasing.  The corporate jet business started in the early 70’s with the Cessna Citation, the Beachcraft King Air … and so the business is flip-flopping going from lots of individual airplanes with individual owners to now, when the majority of the aviation business is in the corporate market.  And they’ve gone from making 18,000 airplanes in 1977 or 1978, and I think last year they made 700.”

Palomar Airport has become the center for corporate jet aircraft in the county, Gibbs said, although new generations of corporate jets, able to land on shorter runways have since been developed.

Two horrible occurrences shall always remained burned in the corporate memory of Gibbs Flying Service.  The first was the midair collision over San Diego of one of its small planes with a Pacific Southwest Airlines jet that overtook it on the approach to Lindbergh Field, resulting in the worst air accident in the United States up to that time.  The second was Montgomery Field’s brief connection to two of the 9/11 terrorists.

The senior Gibbs said that in the case of the midair collision, on September 25, 1978, the student (David Boswell) in a Cessna  “was a commercial pilot, getting his instrument rating.  And the instructor (a Gibbs employee, Martin Kazy) was rated to instruct on the instruments.”

Gibbs said that the PSA crew “made what was called a ‘cowboy approach,’ where you come in and put the wheels down and the  flaps down in a real steep descending turn, and then come down in a very short approach to the runway….”  The plane leveled out in airspace in which the much slower private plane was in front of it, but not easily seen.  “They were warned about it, from the radar control, and they said ‘no, we think we just passed him’ and there was a conflict alert that went off, and then about 17 seconds before they hit.”

Gibbs said one of the two was thrown from the private plane, hitting a building on the east side of Interstate 805, and the small airplane came down (with the other passenger) along the freeway.   The commercial plane took out a row of homes, killing their occupants, as well as the 135 persons aboard.  In total there were 144 persons killed in what to that date was the worst disaster in U.S. aviation history.

The NTSB report focused on mistakes made both by the PSA crew and air traffic controllers.  Gibbs said he had $5 million in insurance, which his insurance company wanted to contribute toward a settlement fund.  Because his people had not been at fault, Gibbs said he first refused.  After two weeks, the insurance company came back and said Pacific Southwest Airlines’ insurance company was willing to indemnify Gibbs if he would contribute $3 million to the settlement package.  He continued to resist, but the insurance company said defending against a class action suit likely would prove more expensive than $3 million, so they were better to be indemnified and out of it.  Gibbs said he agreed only after the insurance company promised not to raise his rates.

The two terrorists included in the 9/11 plot who had done some of their pilot training at Montgomery Field were subsequently identified as Khalid al-Mihdhar and Nawaf al-Hazmi, two Saudi Arabians who were among the five hijackers aboard American Airlines Flight 77 which was crashed into the Pentagon. 

Gibbs said although the two men had been trained by one of the flying clubs at Montgomery Field, and not by Gibbs Flying Service, he had encountered the two usually taciturn men on several occasions, but never had a conversation of any length with them.  He said their cover story was that they were learning to fly so that they could become pilots for members of the Saudi royal family.   He said he recalls they went to Florida after leaving San Diego. 

Several years ago, with Gibbs Flying Service’s latest extension on his lease coming to an end,  a manager in the city’s airport division seemed intent on finding new tenants, prompting quite a bit of protest from Gibbs’ many friends in the aviation industry.  Numerous  letters were written to the City Council in the company’s support, with the result that Gibbs Flying Service is still there.  The company’s 75th anniversary operating on that field comes in 2012.   However, Gibbs Flying Service is on a month-to-month lease, and said Gibbs, if for any reason, the lease is terminated, he expects the family would close the business down.  

General aviation is not what it used to be, and, besides, the family has done quite well on its real estate investments, Gibbs said. 

Gibbs had retired from flying about 20 years ago, explaining that he felt it was neither fair to his passengers nor to people on the ground if something should happen to him while he was piloting an airplane.  He continued to come into the office from time to time, but gradually he did so less and less, leaving the business completely to his son Buzz. 

Gibbs said that he misses flying and confided that being around the airport for too long makes him feel withdrawal pains.

“Bill is part of the legacy of aviation in our San Diego region,” James Kidrick, president and CEO of the San Diego Air & Space Museum said.  He noted that Gibbs has been a consistent supporter of the museum’s scholarship preogram, which encourages excellence in science, technology and mathematics.

Among others, Gibbs has devoted his philanthropy to such organizations as the Salvation Army, including its Joan Kroc Center, and the San Diego Zoo.

*
Harrison is editor of San Diego Jewish World

 

Adventures in San Diego Jewish History, June 25, 1954, Part 3

June 20, 2010 1 comment

Compiled by San Diego Jewish World staff
Southwestern Jewish Press, June 25, 1954, Page 4

Letter to the Editor

Dear Mr. Kaufman

Thos of us who attended the Israeli Day Celebration at Tifereth Israel Synagogue were very much impressed by the speaker, General Eliahu Ben-Hur and the supporting program.

I wish to express my deepest appreciation to those persons who helped plan and organize the program.  It isn’t necessary to mention names—the list would be too long but those who helped will know that their efforts were greatly appreciated.

It is regrettable that so many people whose help was solicited are so completely indifferent to the progress of Israel and to the work being carried on in this country to help promoted that progress, that they feel annoyed and imposed upon when their help in promoting one Israeli celebration per year is requested.

Indifference to a program is a personal matter and not especially regrettable but indifference to the entire question of aid to Israel is one on which considerable confusion appears to exist.  So many of us who consider ourselves good Jews and identify ourselves with the Jewish community as a whole, yet reject so much that is basic in Jewish life.

Perhaps it is first necessary for each of us to determine the basic reason for our personal identification with Judaism. I strongly suspect the reason is the same for all of us although a great many reasons are expressed by many people.  It seems to me that the reason we Jews cling so tenaciously to Judaism is that it answeres our individual need to belong to a group I which we are wholly accepted and needed.

For so many generations, small Jewish groups have been scattered throughout the world. No matter where they were, they always felt their Judaism was oriented towards Israel.  If we reject this orientation, we reject our affiliations with Judaism as a whole.

Let us hope that in the future we will be able to work together at least in commemorating the one great Jewish achievement of our time, the establishment of the State of Israel.

Cordially,
Fred Yaruss, Chairman
S.D. Zionist Council

*
{Editor Mac Kaufman replies}
Southwestern Jewish Press, June 25, 1954, Page 4

In a letter printed elsewhere on this page, the chairman of the Zionist Council bemoans the fact that people are indifferent to celebrations marking the anniversaries of the State of Israel.  He also accuses people of being confused as to their loyalties I Jewish life. In doing so, he makes two amazing statements.

He states, “It seems to me that the reason we Jews cling so tenaciously to our Judaism is that it answers our individual need to belong to a group in which we are wholly accepted and needed.” The chairman obviously has missed the entire point regarding Jewish religious survival for the past 200 years. It didn’t answer any individual need—to be hounded, tortured, burned at the stake, and ostracized.  Jews didn’t decide to belong to any group, there was o questioning they were Jews and lived and died for their religious beliefs.

We again quote, “For so many generations, small Jewish groups have been scattered through the world, no matter where they were, they always felt that their Judaism was oriented toward Israel.  If we reject this orientation, we reject our affiliation with Judaism as a whole.”

Does the chairman of the Zionist Council really mean that Jews living in other lands, who do not look toward Israel as the fountain head of their religion and spiritual life are not Jews?  As far as American Jews are concerned, I suspect that we will survive and continue to expand the influence of Judaism among our people without dropping our interest in Israel as a state.  Of course we are concerned for her welfare. That’s why we contribute so much money.  Of course we will continue to use our influence to defend and help her – but please, Mr. chairman, don’t tell us we are not good Jews if we are not oriented toward Israel. It’s too bad that more Zionists don’t go to Synagogue to see the increased religious sensitivities among Jews of all ages.  It would show them that Judaism need not be centered in any one country or state.

*

Jews in American History
Southwestern Jewish Press, June 25, 1954, Page 4

By Dr. Philip L. Seman, University of Judaism

When John Brown set out to free the slaves he was accompanied by three Jews who had come from parts of Europe where the Jews were still suppressed and persecuted in a state comparable to that of the slaves in America. One of these men was Theodore Weiner, who had come from Poland, the second was Jacob Bernstein, born in Bohemia, and the third, August Bondy, came from Vienna.

They had settled in Kansas and it seemed to them the most natural thing I the world that the slaves should be freed and given equal rights. This, however, did not seem so to their neighbors, who proceeded to burn down Weiner’s barn; such incidents happened to many who were actively involved in anti-slavery activities.

These three Jews were amazed and dismayed.  They understood they had let themselves in for a considerable amount of trouble. They had come from countries where they had been less than slaves, to a country where they were considered free and equal citizens.  However, there seemed to be a condition attached to this new status of equality.  The condition was that they should refrain from thinking that everybody else in the country should be free and equal too.  If they continued to have such ideas, they were bound to suffer.

There was still time to back out, but somehow these Jews could not do so, even though they were not at all the fighting type.  They were peaceful citizens, men who wanted to work and live quietly.  They had no desire to go to war, to spend their nights in the field, to ambush their opponents, much less kill them.  They had even less taste for revolt, and they were grateful that they had been taken in. To be sure, they worked hard and took care of themselves, so that they were on burden to their country. But they felt that perhaps, it was not the right thing for men who had so recently become Americans to tell other Americans what to do.  It was, perhaps, tactless—and this was not to speak of the dangers involved, personal, physical dangers in case of a revolt and the danger of their social position in general. They were practical men, they were realists and for a long time they told themselves that the thing to do was to be silent and to do nothing. If the Americans wanted to keep a part of their own people in slavery that was their business.

But in spite of such reflections, in spite of all their practical deliberations, their feelings that the slave question was their business grew stronger and stronger within them. Besides, the fact that they themselves had escaped by coming to this country imposed upon them a moral obligation, a definite duty to help others in their fight for liberation. That is why they joined John Brown, a man who was regarded by many as a revolutionary and of a very dubious character.  They joined him even though they were somewhat uncertain of their ability to do actual fighting. They joined him because they could not do otherwise. (To be continued).

*
As the Psychologist Sees You
Southwestern Jewish Press, June 25, 1954, Page 4

By Irving R. Stone, Psychological Consultant

School’s Out – Perhaps you heard the same hurried footsteps and the shouts of youngsters that I heard the other day. You might have wondered, as I did, what caused the happy and almost frantic running and shouting. A glance at the desk calendar soon gave me the answer. There was a very good reason for the children’s glee.

With the closing of schools for the summer months, new problems confront teachers, parents, and even the children. Most teachers find that they must either take courses during the summer in order to meet credential requirements, to complete preparations for advanced degrees, or to qualify for salary increases, or must find some work during what should be their vacation period in order to supplement an inadequate salary.

Parents, too, are perplexed as to how to handle the situation of having their youngsters literally under their feet for five or six additional hours of the day. Some overcome the problem by sending their children away to camp for weeks at a time or to day camp.  Others find that they can take a few hours a day for their own vacations by spending the time at the beach. Still others use the time to visit relatives, take motor trips as a family unit to places of interest, or stock the car or trailer with needed equipment and go off to some restful area for camping.

Finally, the children have a problem. At last they have an opportunity to sleep late, to stay up a little later before going to bed, to play in the neighborhood as much as they’d like and to go to the movies more often than on Saturday afternoons. But all that is interesting for about a week and then the sudden change has its reactions.  Unless there is a plan of activity, boredom sets in.

Some children find summer school attendance a satisfaction instead of a chore. Although many attend in order to make up for a scholastic deficiency, an equal number go to participate in advanced courses or recreational programs such as arts and crafts or music. Others find the courses conducted by the zoo or museum of great interest. Still others take part in recreational activities conducted by the city recreation department, while some attend day camps sponsored by community centers.

School’s Out may be a problem to teachers, parents and children but they are problems that can be, and are, solved by most.  However, where there is no planning there is little enjoyment of what should be a time for fun, education and relaxation.

*
From Where I Sit

Southwestern Jewish Press, June 25, 1954, Page 4

By Mel Goldberg

It seems a shame that the U.S. Government doesn’t take advantage of its best resource for a security checking board. We refer to an examination team that would be made up of nice little old Jewish grandmothers… Let them examine a doubtful witness as they would a chicken—and we guarantee that if the person in question ate Russian dressing on a salad in 1944, they’d detect it quicker than all of McCarthy’s assistants. … Just consider Grandma’s qualifications…. What inquisitions those poor ole chickens had to go through before Grandma tabbed ‘em okeh for human consumption.

The gizzard and liver inspection was a probe more detailed than an autopsy conducted under the personal supervision of the Mayo Brothers … Heaven forbid, the chicken should have had a slight bruise—then the poultry man, “That terrible goniff,” was plotting to poison us by the most heinous of methods … ah, those were the days! …The worst task that could confront a “modern” grandchild was to assist Grandma shopping… To accompany her to a store selling fruit or baked goods was a horrifying experience. Each roll or peach represented an individual challenge. It had to be felt, scrutinized and squeezed thoroughly … This was the original “third degree.”

The dirty looks of the disconcerted storekeeper meant absolutely nothing in Grandma’s eyes… Small merchants were a world apart, and represented a highly organized movement to separate the poor housewife from her money with shoddy merchandise at inflated prices. Grandma didn’t need any such thing as a government price control on commodities… every purchase was followed by the same familiar tune, that ran something like this –“What do you mean you want five dollars for it?  Can’t you take four?  It can buy it by Feinbaum down the street for that.”
*
The audience at the Wednesday Club recital of Cantor Cysner could not help but marvel; at the agility of the custodian there, 94-year-old John Olson. Mr.Olson tends the grounds, stacks the chairs, etc., and even looks after the trash cans of neighbors in the area. The irony of the story is – when Mr. Olson came to San Diego 21 years ago and applied for a similar club at the Thursday Club, he was turned down because he was “too old!” 

Emmanuel Mayer, a former San Diegan, who now resides near Guadelajara, Mexico, is spending a few months here.  According to him, the weather in that section of Mexico makes our local climate look pretty foul. Until we talked with Mayer, we had felt sorry for the people who live in the rest of the U.S.  He’s sorry for us so we don’t know who’s sorry for who now!

*
Joe Weiss heard about a sword swallower who choked to death.  He wasn’t “fixed for blades.” … Julius Monteer’s definition of an optimist:  A man who is 85 years of age contemplates marriage and insists upon looking for an apartment near a public school… Wonder how Jack Tenney can twist this around: Two prominent members of the Los Angeles Jewish community—Arthur A. Dresser, an attorney, and Harold B. Garfield, a  member of the California State Board of Pharmacy – have presented a 100-acre campus site, secured by them at a cost of $400,000 to the proposed new Baptist University of San Fernando Valley.

One of the alleged problems in San Diego is the social life of the young single Jewish adult. Frankly, we can’t see any great problems involved with the young adults … When we say young—we mean just that—and not our good friends, who like the writer, clutch to the creeping years and prefer to forget the last six, eight, and in some cases, ten birthdays… Many women in this older age group face a terrific problem in locating a suitable Jewish social group with which to affiliate…. Frequently limited finances prevent their aligning themselves with a religious organization’s clubs – and those who must work for a living, as most of these folks do, cannot link themselves with the luncheon meeting, mah-jong playing type of group. This is a problem that could be alleviated by some concerted planning during the summer months.

As  to the social problems of the young single adult: If the guys would stop thinking that they are Heaven’s gift to women available in human form, and if the girls would realize that they are not Marilyn Monroesteins in any shape—for certain, or manner, and if in addition to this both sexes would “do” a little “doing” in the existent organizations, the bored ones would have a lot less to grouse about … We’re fixin’ to hear a lot of criticism on our philosophy and we’ll be happy to discuss the subject at greater length.

*
Institute to be Held by Hospital Council

Southwestern Jewish Press, June 25, 1954, Page 4

The Hospital Council of San Diego County and the California Hospital Association will co-sponsor a Hospital Public Relations Institute in San Diego on Friday, July 9, 1954.  Louis Peelyon, President of the Hospital Council and Administrator of Grossmont Hospital, announced.

The Institute is one of a series to be held throughout the State and is conducted under the auspices of the Council of Public Education, California Hospital Association.

*
Double Talk

Southwestern Jewish Press, June 25, 1954, Page 5

By Janet and Susan Solof.

Hi All!

Quite a number of our gals and guys received honors and scholarships at the recent graduations of the different high schools. Some of these include Elaine Burdman and Eileen Rivers receiving the student faculty scholarship, Elana Barach with a scholarship to Milwaukee Donner College, Judy Yukon a scholarship to University of California, Gloria Abrahamson, B’nai B’rith Youth of the year award, Sigmond Ohrback, outstanding grades, Ed Ruskin received the honor of Boys highest scholastic grades, Lawrence Schiller, a scholarship to Pepperdine College and Dan Schaffer a scholarship to Harvard University. Congrats to you all for your outstanding work.

Heading Wilson Jr. High School’s student government for next year is Phil Brenes who was recently elected President of the school. Gold luck, Phil.

Vacationing in L.A. for fun and business were Janet Solof and Luanne Blumberg who was sent as representatives to the Red Cross Convention as officers of the Jr. Red Cross.

On her way to Girl’s State is Sherry Newman and from there to the University of Denver for the summer.

Lenny Weiss, Larry Cahan, Myron Shapiro and Steve Kirchtel motored to New York for the summer and Gary Chenkin is leaving for Mexico City.

Ellen Goldstein is spending the entire summer touring Europe. Also Henrietta and Bobby Faguet.

“Sharing the fun of being sweet sixteen is not half so great as experiencing it yourself.”  My sister Janet quoted these words after a lovely dinner given at the San Diego Club for the Sweet Sixteen birthday. Many of her friends shared the thrill with her. She was honored at a surprise beach party given by her school friends.

Sixteenth birthdays seem to be in style and a pretty good style at that. Adrienne Sachnoff as she celebrated her sixteenth birthday in real style with a lovely luncheon at Town and Country Club with a group of her many friends. Best wishes, Adrienne.

“That’s what I call fun” were the remarks made after Morton Cohn’s terrific party. A bar-b-que and dancing made the party complete.

Leani Leichtag entertained her friends with a beautiful party. The gang swam, ate and danced and had fun.

Among those who invaded our fair city, returning from college are Esther Lustig, Gary Breitbard, Burt Sharp, Linda Solof, Larry Solomon, Roslyn Burdman, Sam Sosna, Jean Goldstein.

Have a wonderful vacation and phone your news to CY-5-0679.

Money Still Talks
Southwestern Jewish Press, June 25, 1954, Page 5

An angry man should count to ten before he speaks – if his wife is angry he should count out ten and let them speak for him.
*
“Adventures in Jewish History” is sponsored by Inland Industries Group LP in memory of long-time San Diego Jewish community leader Marie (Mrs. Gabriel) Berg. Our indexed “Adventures in San Diego Jewish History” series will be a regular feature until we run out of history. 

San Diego’s Historic Places: John J. Montgomery Monument

June 17, 2010 4 comments

 

John J. Montgomery Monument, Otay Mesa area of San Diego

By Donald H. Harrison

Donald H. Harrison

SAN DIEGO—Large enough to be seen from vantage points across the border in Mexico, the wing of a World War II era Liberator bomber stands upright on the hill in Otay Mesa where some historians say pioneer aviator John J. Montgomery made the first controlled flight on a glider ever made in the United States.

The flight reportedly occurred August 28, 1883, two decades before the Wright Brothers made their first powered flight, but Montgomery’s achievement wasn’t recorded until the 1894 publication of Progress in Flying Machines, a compendium of aeronautical achievements compiled by the engineer Octave Chanute.  As there were no independent witnesses of the flight, other aeronautical historians have expressed doubts about the feat.

The pioneers of aviation—including Montgomery and the Wright Brothers—conducted their testing in great secrecy in order to be the first to bring their inventions to the patent office, so it is not surprising that only relatives claimed to be witnesses to the 600-foot flight Montgomery made in a flying machine with curved wings.

Montgomery’s brother, Jim, described the event as follows:  “I towed John into the air in his little glider at the end of a 40 foot rope.  He flew over my head and landed beautifully about six hundred feet down the hill.”

At 90 feet high, the wing which now towers over the recreation center at Montgomery-Waller Park in the Otay Mesa area of San Diego is fully 15 percent as long as Montgomery’s first flight.   The monument dedicated in 1950 was created by architect Lloyd Ruocco, who also designed such well- known landmarks in the City of San Diego as the County Administration Building between Harbor Drive and Pacific Coast Highway, and the Civic Theatre at 3rd Avenue at B Street.  The wing commemorating Montgomery’s first flight was in itself a piece of San Diego history, as Consolidated Aircraft  in San Diego manufactured the B-24s.

Montgomery-Waller Park is named both for the pioneer aviator as well as for Luckie Waller, who donated the land for the park and for whom the local Little League is named. The park is one of several places named for John J. Montgomery, with others being the nearby Montgomery High School and Montgomery Middle School in the Sweetwater Union High School District, Montgomery Elementary School in Chula Vista, and another Montgomery Middle School in the San Diego Unified School District.   More closely related to Montgomery’s aeronautical achievements is Montgomery Field, a general aviation airport in the Kearny Mesa area of San Diego.

In 1962, ceremonies at the unusual looking monument included flyovers by antique and contemporary aircraft, a performance by a local Navy band, and an exhibit of a replica of the glider in which he flew.

The inscription at the site reads: “John J. Montgomery Made Man’s First Controlled Winged Flight From This Hilltop in August 1883. He opened for all mankind the great highway of the sky”

Consolidated Vultee Aircraft’s successor, Consolidated Vultee (which later became known as Convair) and Columbia Pictures were among the corporate sponsors of the Ruocco-designed monument.

Montgomery’s life was chronicled in the 1946 Columbia Picture Gallant Journey, directed by William Wellman and starring Glenn Ford as Montgomery and Janet Blair as Ginny Cleary, the woman who believed in him.   Paul Mantz was the stunt pilot for that film.   Surprisingly, although the film dramatizes a San Diego historical event, none of the public or university libraries in the county listed Gallant Journey in their catalogues as of mid-June 2010.  The biopic can be found, however, in the Santa Clara library.

Although the first flight in San Diego is covered in Gallant Journey, a larger portion of the film deals with Montgomery’s achievements in the Santa Clara area where, while serving on the faculty of Santa Clara College,  he continued to experiment with controlled flight.

Montgomery’s test pilot Daniel John Maloney would ascend in a tandem-winged glider named the Santa Clara that was tethered to a hot air balloon, then upon release, would glide to a safe landing on the ground from 3,900 feet.  However, during one demonstration in 1905 a handling line became tangled in the wings, and Maloney died in the crash.

In 1911, Montgomery personally tested a monoplane glider called the Evergreen, making approximately 50 flights of perhaps 780 feet each.  On October 31, 1911, from only an altitude of 20 feet, the glider crashed, causing Montgomery’s head to slam into an exposed bolt.  He died two hours later at age 53.

In San Jose, Montgomery Hill is named for the aviator as is Montgomery Elementary School in that city.  A Kent Roberts sculpture of a 30-foot glider wing was dedicated in 2008 in a 32-foot diameter plaza at the intersection of Yerba Buena and San Felipe Roads.

*
Harrison is editor of San Diego Jewish World

Adventures in San Diego Jewish History, June 11, 1954, Part 3

June 16, 2010 1 comment

Compiled by San Diego Jewish World staff

To See Or not To See
Southwestern Jewish Press, June 11, 1954, page 4

By Berenice Soule

This Hurts Me—In the “cultural center” 140 miles to the north, a theatrephile can see this summer: “The Seven Year Itch” with Eddie Bracken; the four prize winner, “Picnic”; Yul Brynner in “The King and I”; the New York City Ballet presenting 5 different programs from July 5 through August 15; “Carmen” with stars of the Met and the N.Y. City Opera Co., and “The Mikado.”

The Theatre Guild, bringing “The Seven Year Itch” will present five other hits, among them very likely, “St. Joan,” “Tea and Sympathy,” with Deborah Kerr; “Oh, Men! Oh, Women”; and “The Remarkable Mr. Pennypacker.”

It’s not too much to expect that some of these shows would travel down to this “suburb” of L.A. if we had adequate housing for them. A suitable theatre in San Diego would encourage greater attendance among local residents and attract many more of those tourist dollars everyone is out for.

It’s time we stopped thinking of San Diego in the terms of the small town it was twenty years ago.  A population increase isn’t the only requirement of a big city; that larger population must be given at least the advantages it would receive in other cities of comparable size.  It’s interesting to note that Berlin—with its practicably insurmountable task of rebuilding—is building an auditorium and Ankara, Turkey, with a population of about 400,000 is also erecting one.

“The Heiress”—A community theatre group has the right and a duty to its participant to produce drama yet fail to do more often because of audience disinterest. Amateurs most often find comedy the best medium if pleasing the public is the goal.

Rarely can a small group produce a drama as emotionally moving and as sensitively touching as one expects from professionals but the Coronado Players with “The Heiress” proved it’s not impossible.  The tragedy in this drama arises from tensions created by innate temperament antagonisms not from dramatic action, thus it depends almost entirely on character definition.

Much of the praise must go to Elinor Canedy and Bill Roesch for the finely drawn interpretations of their roles which sustained the necessary mood throughout.  Selden Hooper was properly hateful as the unloving father and Arline Fort Detyens was well cast as the sentimental aunt.

In a bit part, Bettye Pack was delightful to watch and no doubot will be seen in larger roles.  Other members of the excellent cast were Marie Durland, Lucille Parsons, Pat Twelvetrees and Jeanne Curcio.

Mabel Chamberlain deserves the credit for the lovely 1850 costumes, all of which were designed and made by her or under her direction.

Summer and Suds—One can never accuse the Coronado Players of not knowing when they’ve got a good thing – for this year again their summer attraction will be the ever hilarious ‘Suds in Your Eye,” scheduled to open at the Playhouse on the Strand July 8.

Appointment – John Robert Clarke of the “Adventures in Living” series has received a spring appointment at San Diego State College to conduct the senior Shakespeare course and other classes of Dr. Frank Johnson, popular State College professor currently on sick leave.

Star Light Opener – “Oklahoma” enters its final rehearsal stages tonight to ready itself for a July 1 opening. While, for the past few months, cast member of all five Star-Light musicals to be produced this summer have been working, now, everything they’ve got will be poured into readying the opening show.

Star-Light dancing, under the direction of Marguerite Ellicott, has always been excellent and costuming superior as handled by Nemecia Ascarate Dean. “Oklahoma” will prove both a fertile ground and a challenge in these fields so we expect great things from Miss Ellicott and Mrs. Dean.

Home Talent – Charles Jeffers, familiar with every back-stage job and who this side of the backdrop has  carried spears and leading roles, has grown into one of San Diego’s most talented young men.  He will serve as dramatic  director of “Babes in Toyland,” the Park and Recreation  Department’s summer operetta.

Jeff has been studying drama at the University of South Carolina and word has drifted back that’s he’s earning honors there, too.

Extra-Curricular—Vincent Price, co-starring in “The Winslow Boy” with Dorothy McGuire for La Jolla Playhouse this summer, is scheduled to appear in San Francisco and read the Declaration of Independence for an Israel Bond Drive dinner this month.

*
Raasche to Appear for Group June 20
Southwestern Jewish Press, June 11, 1954, page 4

Fresh from her European triumphs and a successful Los Angeles concert, folk singer Raasche will appear for the Pioneer Negba Club Dinner on June 20.  Her songs include music from four historic epochs: Biblical; and prophetic, the Diaspora, including the Ladino, or Judio-Spanish period; the ingathering of the folk and return to the homeland; and contemporary Israel music.

The Chicago-born contralto’s performances in Paris and London last winter proved the surprise sensation of the season. She is a former star of Borschteapades” and the “Hour of Israel” radio show and has sung extensively for USO and hospital tours.

‘Winslow Boy’ Set for La Jolla June 29
Southwestern Jewish Press, June 11, 1954, page 4

Dorothy McGuire, beloved member of the Board of Producers of La Jolla Playhouse, will launch this summer’s series co0starring with Vincent Price in Terence Rattigan’s “The Winslow Boy.”

“The Winslow Boy,” the first of five plays scheduled for the eighth season of La Jolla Playhouse, will open Tuesday, June 29 and will run through Saturday, July 10.

In addition to announcing the first production, John Swope, executive producer, revealed that at lest two of this summer’s plays will be current New York comedy hits, in keeping with the pattern set last summer when La Jolla patrons saw “My Three Angels” and “Dial M for Murder,” while they were still being produced on Broadway. Specific announcements as to the two New York hit will be made withi a few days.

Tickets to “The Winslow Boy” and other individual plays of the season will go on general sale Monday morning, June 14, at the box office.

Phil Silver explains politics this way: “Politicians shouldn’t be so haughty. … after all, today’s President is tomorrow’s three cent stamp.”

J.W.V. Auxiliary Garden Tea Planned for Members
Southwestern Jewish Press, June 11, 1954, page 5

A membership tea is being planned by Jr. Vice-Pres Sophie Silberman and her committee for the JWVA 185.  It will be held in the garden of the home of Henrietta Cohen at 4565 Norma Drive, on Tuesday, June 29, at 1:30 p.m.

A speaker from the Department of California JWVA in Los Angeles will be present to outline the important work of JWVA.  Entertainment will be in the form of a skit performed by members of the auxiliary, and directed by Eva Finn.

Refreshments will be prepared and served by members of the committee and board. A very cordial invitation to attend is extended to the Jewish women of our community who are eligible for membership by being mother, wife, sister, or daughter of a veteran or serviceman of the United States of America Armed Forces.  For reservations or information please call Atwater 1-8735, Atwater 2-6677.

*
City of Hope Aux
Southwestern Jewish Press, June 11, 1954, page 5

Did you see the huge picture of Gov. Goodwin J. Knight in the June 1st edition of the L.A. Examiner, signing up his 2-year-old granddaughter, April Eaton, as California first City of Hope Little Helper?

Cowboy star Roy Rogers, who is sponsoring the campaign, signs each Little Helper’s membership card—each member also receives a pin.  Anyone interested in signing up their children or grandchildren contact our President Ethel Berwin.

Our next luncheon meeting will be on June 15th at the Beth Jacob Center -12 noon. Anna Lazarowitz and Muriel Strauss are Chairmen for the luncheon.

*
Del Mar Track Is Open July 27

Southwestern Jewish Press, June 11, 1954, page 5

DEL MAR, Calif., June 10 – An imposing total of 87 swift 2-year-olds have been kept eligible for the seventh running of the $25,000 added Del Mar Futurity, highlight of the summer meeting “where the turf meets the surf,” it was announced today by General Manager Clive H. Becker.  Del Mar’s season begins July 27.

The Futurity, famed as one of the nation’s outstanding classics for juveniles, will be presented on Del Mar’s closing day, Sept. 11, and is expected to have a gross value close to $50,000.

*
Bay City B.B. Women

Southwestern Jewish Press, June 11, 1954, page 5

The time has come when once again thoughts of outdoor living and garden parties are foremost and in keeping with the trend Bay City B’nai B’rith Chapter has set aside Thursday, June 17th as the day for their garden party.

This event, to be held at the home of Mrs. David Schloss, 4525 48th St., is being sponsored by the members of the board and is chaired by the 3 past presidents, Mrs. Schloss, Mrs. Sanford Sack and Mrs. Harold Garvin.

The luncheon will be served at 12:00 noon, with cards, Mah Jong, etc., to follow.  A donation of $1.25, the proceeds to be used for the many B’nai B’rith philanthropies, locally and otherwise, will entitle one to a most enjoyable afternoon.

The luncheon is open to all members and friends and reservations may be made with Mrs. Addis, AT-2-6274, or Mrs. Elkin, HO-6-5950.

*
Internal Immigration Offsets Newcomer Drop in Israel
Southwestern Jewish Press, June 11, 1954, page 5

JERUSALEM—Immigration from all countries has slowed town to a negligible number, but internal immigration has added to the population rate at the rate of 30,000 births a year.

Only 11,800 immigrants came to Israel in 1953, and the umber has decreased this year, with only 3,000 arriving through June.

*
Mexican Vacation Spa Popular With Americans
Southwestern Jewish Press, June 11, 1954, page 5

San Jose de Purua, the wonder spa of the western world, offers an ideal vacation spot for San Diegans.  Located about 115 miles from Mexico City, the resort is easily accessible by air from Tijuana.  The retreat boasts an ideal all year climate—of great importance to summer vacationists—because it is situated at an altitude of 4300 feet with an average temperature of 71.6 degrees, varying less than 10 degrees throughout the year.

The food at San Jose de Purua is an epicurean delight, highly recommended by international travelers.  The resort has four swimming pools, one of which is reserved for children, and in addition provides bath houses for individual radio-active spring baths, staffed by skilled attendants and a competent physician.

Information about San Jose de Purua, and all Mexican resorts, may be obtained from the Mexico Travel Service, 740 E. St., San Diego.

*
Home of Peace Mausoleum Sanctified
Southwestern Jewish Press, June 11, 1954, page 5

The Memorial Day Services, held at Cypress View Mausoleum on May 30 , were highlighted by the dedication of the Home of Peace Mausoleum and Chapel. Rabbi Morton J. Cohn and Cantor Julian Miller conducted the services, with Mack Esterson and Sol Stone taking part.

Members of the Committee responsible for the completion of the beautiful new Mausoleum were Morris W. Douglas, Ben Rubin, Henry Weinberger, and Dr. Robert M. Stone.

*

Danny Kaye: The meaning of a kiss: To a young girl … faith; to a woman … hope; to an old maid … charity.”
*

“Adventures in Jewish History” is sponsored by Inland Industries Group LP in memory of long-time San Diego Jewish community leader Marie (Mrs. Gabriel) Berg. Our indexed “Adventures in San Diego Jewish History” series will be a regular feature until we run out of history.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 110 other followers