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Jane Schaffer, expert on essay composition, dies

August 22, 2010 13 comments

SAN DIEGO (SDJW)–Jane Schaffer, a master teacher whose methodology for writing essays is taught in high schools around the country, died of brain cancer early Sunday morning at home.  She was 64.

Schaffer, wife of San Diego Jewish World contributor and former San Diego Jewish Times columnist Dan Schaffer, had valiantly fought the cancer up until the time earlier this month when she slipped into a coma.

Her brave fight was the subject of a prize-winning essay written by her daughter, Sarah Cooper and reprinted on San Diego Jewish World.   The essay may be accessed by clicking here.Arrangements for a celebration of her life are being made, family members said.

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Preceding was a San Diego Jewish World staff report

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Adventures in San Diego Jewish History, October 15, 1954, Part 3

July 27, 2010 Leave a comment

Compiled by San Diego Jewish World staff

Double Talk
Southwestern Jewish Press, October 15, 1954, Page 6

By Janet & Susan Solof

Elaine Shapery really shot the works with swimming, dinner and dancing at the Kona Kai celebrating her 16th birthday.  Among those shooting the guns of fun were Larry Prager, Ed Rosenthal, Martin Weiner, Sonya Weitzman, Kay Prager, Nancy Goodman, Roger Brenes, Larry Zlotoff, Harry Ratner, Linda Douglas, Bob Bloomer, Don Chadwick, Barbara Kahn, Robin McStroud, Moe Barancik, Bob Glassman, Bob Meyers, Roslyn Steffel, Roberta Wyloge and Ethel Gardner.

Barbara Silverman’s home was really “jumping” the night she gave a swimming, dinner, dancing party.  All of Barbara’s friends had a “cool” time.

Stan Breitbard ‘n Jan Klaskin, Barbara Silverman ‘n Buddy Kader, Diane Fogelman ‘n Alan Friedman, Susan Solof ‘n Gary Cantor, Linda Zuckerman ‘n Phil Kaplan really made a night of it as they celebrated their various birthdays.  First they met at Susan’s for “coketails” and then to a dance. Really fun.

Scoop:  Congrats to Stan Breitbard who won a tennis trophy at the Town and Country Club.

Danny Schaefer (sic, Schaffer) says “hello” to all the kids.  Danny’s having a wonderful time at Harvard Univerity. 

Who was it we saw changing a tire on that lonely road?  It looked like Sonny and Alan.

Bye now – CY 5-0679.

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Deceased
Southwestern Jewish Press, October 15, 1954, Page 6

Terry Rittoff, a former resident here for 43 years, died on Oct. 2nd in Beverly Hills, L.A.  Burial was in the Home of Peace Cemetery, Rabbi Monroe Levens officiating.

Survivors include three sons, Dr. J.A. and Jack Rittoff of San Diego, Leo, of Tucson, Arizona, and two daughters, MRs. Eta Greenfield and Mrs. Jessie Ponitz, of Los Angeles.

During her residency here Mrs. Rittoff was a member of Tifereth Israel Synagogue. She was also a Charter Member of the Jolly 16 Club.

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Democrat States Position on Liquor

Southwestern Jewish Press, October 15, 1954, Page 6

James M. Edmunds, Democratic Candidate for the State Senate, today pledged that he would further laws for liquor reform to make it impossible for violators to go unpunished.

“Laws that leave room for bribery and corruption taint the entire government,” Edmunds said.  He also expressed support for a school program to end double sessions, development of beach and Park facilities and a highway program in S.D. County that will meet our transportation needs.

The young attorney lives with his wife and son in Chula Vista.

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Lasker Lodge News

Southwestern Jewish Press, October 15, 1954, Page 6

October 25th will be our annual membership meeting. This will be one of the most outstanding of the year … one you must not miss.  We have Marty Drake, prominent movie, TV and radijo star to entertain us in a hilarious one-hour show.  Marty is real top-notch entertainment, having appeared for 28 weeks in “Bagels and Lox” and on several of Al Jolson’s shows.

Past District Grand President Dave (Pasadena) Goldman, will be the guest of honor and Maurice Hamberger, district secretary, will be on hand to give one of his usual inspiring messages. The meeting is designed to attract prospective new members for the lodge, so be certain you bring a guest.

Better start making plans to attend our annual fund-raising affair “San Diego Lasker’s “Boom Nite” to be held at the Veterans War Memorial Building in Balboa Park on Saturday, November 13,  There will be exciting games and many other attractive enticements to make your evening a most enjoyable one.

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(The Run Down)
Southwestern Jewish Press, October 15, 1954, Page 6

A right to run down the rest of the world does not go with the purchase of a driver’s license.

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Jewish Community Center News

Southwestern Jewish Press, October 15, 1954, Page 6

The fall schedule of center activities has recently been announced and provisions for all age groups and leisure time activities have been arranged. Those desiring further information can call the center office at AT 1-7744, or see Mr. Posin, center director, at 3277 El Cajon Boulevard.

Mr. Maxwell Kaufman, chairman of the center Personnel committee, announced that the following persons will assist in the pgoram; Arts and Crafts, Miss Ethel Mallinger; Ceramics, Mrs. Cornelio Elias and Fred Kaufman; Painting, MRs. A.I. Dickman; Dance, Mrs. E. Berger, Mrs. J. Timen, Mr. John Tucker and Miss Ethel Mallinger; Drama Mrs. A.H. Bursten; Co—operative Nursery School, Mrs. T. Raun; Bridge, Mrs. Hazel M. Brunn; Group Leaders, Dave Bannister, Barbara Sanders, Reitha Stokes and Tom Waters.

Mr. Posin invites the participation of interested individuals who desire to volunteer their time and talent to enrich the program and to assist people in achieving a happy and healthy group experience.

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J.C.C. Prexy Offers Thanks to Volunteers
Southwestern Jewish Press, October 15, 1954, Page 6

Mr. Edward A. Breitbard, President of the Jewish Community Center wishes to express his thanks and appreciation to the large number of individuals who volunteered their time to participate in the Jewish Community Center self-study.  The results pof their interest and efforts will enable the center to provide the San Diego community with the best planned recreational facility serving the largest number of participants in their social, cultural, and leisure-time activities.

Additional thanks to the following volunteers whose clerical help provided the work books for the 20 study committees: Mrs. Jack Fine, Mrs. Hyman Kitaen, Mrs. Al Pechman, Mrs. Sidney Weiss, and Mrs. Ruth Yates.

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(Hebrew Home)
Southwestern Jewish Press, October 15, 1954, Page 6

Application for admission to the Hebrew Home for the Aged may be made through the Jewish Social Service Agency, 333 Plaza, BE-2-5172.

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Candidates To Speak At Temple Dinner

Southwestern Jewish Press, October 15, 1954, Page 6

The Temple Beth Israel Men’s Club will have its annual Political Dinner October 26 at 6:30 in the Temple Center.

Democratic and republican candidates will speak giving their party’s views on the issues of the day. Among the well known speakers will be: Dr. Ross T. McIntire, James M. Edmunds, Fred Kraft and Bob Wilson.

Members will have an opportunity to question the speakers after the talks.

For further information and reservations contact the Program Chairman Don Pogrell at AC-3-7529.

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Will Speak for Bonds
Southwestern Jewish Press, October 15, 1954, Page 6

The Jan Peerce dinner will mark the occasion of the organization of the San Diego Chapter of Guardians of Israel. Those who purchase Bonds in the amount of at least $1,000, establishing themselves as leading investors in the future of Israel become Guardians who will receive official recognition from the State of Israel in the form of lapel pins, and by having their names entered in official records of the Knesset (Parliament) in Israel.

With the community galvanized by news of the Jan Peerce gathering, pre-dinner preparations took on added pace and luster this week with the announcement that His Excellency Dr. Joseph Burg, Minister of Posts, Telephone and Telegraph of the State of Israel will be in San Diego for conferences with community leadership and for Bond sales meetings to assure maximum participation by October 24th.

A cross-section of community leadership is working with Murray Goodrich in organizing dinner participation.

Co-Chairmen are Isaac Domnitz, Harry Snyder, Louis Moorsteen and Edward Breitbard, Dr. A. Nasatir.  With Domnitz, who also serves as Chairman of the Labor Zionist Committee for Israel Bonds, are Labor Zionist co-chairmen Reuben Umansky and Joseph Olsher.  Activating B’nai B’rith membership for the event is Chairman Edward Breitbard and his co-chairmen, Ralph Feldman, Harry Schloss and Morrie Kraus.  In the B’nai B’rith Chapters, Mrs. Natalie Meyers and Mrs. Morrie Kraus are marshalling forces for the dinner.

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Forty Years of Service (Editorial Page)

Southwestern Jewish Press, October 15, 1954, Page 7

“What is the Jolly 16?” is not an unusual question for newcomers to San Diego who do not know the forty year old history of this small group with the frivolous name and the long record of philanthropy in our city.

The original Jolly 16 Club was formed prior to the First World War, as a Sewing Circle, long before the advent of professional workers and organized charities in this city. Articles of clothing were made for the needy and food supplied wherever necessary. Service was rendered to refugees in Tijuana, awaiting admittance into the United States. Newcomers were given a head start with everything from lumber for homes to livestock, trucks or loans necessary to purchase merchandise for a start in business. Today, many of these families, their early struggles way behind them, are substantial citizens of the community.

During the First World War two orphans were adopted by the members and supported until they reached the age of 16 years.  Yearly scholarships, started many years ago, for worthy young people are still granted by the group. It was the Jolly 16 Club with other existing organizations, who formed the first Jewish Welfare Society in San Diego. The interest shown in the aged throughout the years, was the inspiration which gave the present group the courage to help found the S.D. Hebrew Home for the Aged, which is breaking ground for their new building this Sunday.

Individual members are well known throughout the community for their leadership and participation in community-wide activities, both in civic and welfare projects in San Diego, and the group as a whole assumes obligations that many a larger group would hesitate to undertake. 

The Community should be proud to help this organization celebrate their forty years of service in San Diego.

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Decent Elections (Editorial)
Southwestern Jewish Press, October 15, 1954, Page 7

The political campaign of ’54 is on – Democrats and Republicans are out on the stump. The ational stake at the polls November 2nd are 423 House seats and 37 Senatorships.  In California, a Governor and Senator will be chosen. In San Diego, a Congressman and several local positions will be fought over.

Each party is trying to win control of the next Congress, while in State and local contests each party seeks additional  triumphs. However, there can be no victory—anywhere –unless both parties wage decent campaigns.

Our political competitions should be conducted just as we conduct our sports—fair and according to the rules. In politics the rule book calls for a campaign based only on legitimate issues. It rejects any attempt to win votes through low-blow appeals to racial and religious animosities.

The American people want this campaign to follow the rule book. They insist that all political candidates-Local, State and National – follow faithfully the principal of fair play as enunciated by Pres. Eisenhower and Adlai E. Stevenson.  Neither the Republican or Democratic parties will gain a victory unless the follow the rules of fair play.

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Jews in American History~300 Years
Southwestern Jewish Press, October 15, 1954, Page 7

By Dr. Philip L. Seman, University of Judaism

General Grant Order No. 11 on December 17, 1862 read: The Jews as a class violating every regulation of trade established by the Treasury Department and also department orders, are hereby expelled from the department within twenty-four hours from the receipt of this order.  Post commanders will see to it that all of this class of people be furnished passes and required to leave, and any one returning after such notification will be arrested and held in confinement until an opportunity occurs of sending them out as prisoners , unless furnished with permit from headquarters etc. etc.” by order of Major General U.S. Grant, signed by Assistant Adjutant General.

The order was based on the  fact that the Northom and Trans-Atlantic mills had turned away their working men for want of cotton; the Confederacy never possessed, even at the outbreak of war, enough of the stuff of survival; we are told by Dr. Korn. We learn further that here at this shifting line of battle through Tennessee and Mississippi were thousands of bales of “King Cotton,” for which the South had no use but which would fetch high premiums in the factory cities up North.  Speculators would  trade merchandise and arms for cotton and other Southern agricultural products and found men  in uniform who were eager to share in the profits.

It was during this profiteering that the most sweeping Anti-Jewish regulation in all American history was issued. It was known as General Grant Order No. 11 referred to above. To be sure, there may have been some Jews among this profiteering group but there were others than Jews by far who profiteered. During this period there was much discussion and questions were asked by Jews and non-Jews, why stigmatize the Jews since they were only a few among many others?  Dr. Korn seems to feel after a very careful examination that the Jews were used as a scapegoat, already prepared and identified, handed down from one age to the ext, hounded and hunted from one country to another, the Jews were a myth, a people branded as the purveyor of all manner of wickedness.  This we know, is an old story. The Jews were the natural scapegoat even in the United States and thus General Grant Order No. 11.

Some seemed to feel that during the controversy that the expulsion of the Jews had been foisted upon Grant by influential cotton buyers to pave the way for higher profits for themselves.  While there is no verification for suspicions or accusations, it is a fact that only Jews and not all traders were banished; cotton traders as a group were not expelled.  The question therefore, which was asked by many Jews and non-Jews alike, “Who stood to profit from the departure of Jews as the result of the Order?”  The answer seems evident that other traders and speculators, civilians as well as military, were among the greatest profiteers.   To be continued.

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(Youth Building)
Southwestern Jewish Press, October 15, 1954, Page 7

A youth building for use by Boy and Girl Scouts, 4-H Clubs, FFA groups and other organizations is projected at the Southern California Exposition grounds, Del Mar.  During the Exposition it will be used for exhibits.

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Opens New Shop
Southwestern Jewish Press, October 15, 1954, Page 7

Ruth Brussels has purchased the House of Fascination located in the Granger Bldg, Room 220. She will carry a full line of sweaters, hose, costume jewelry.

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Retarded Children Group Plans Activity
Southwestern Jewish Press, October 15, 1954, Page 7

The San Diego Association for Retarded Children is making preparations for a publicity and fund raising campaign to coincide with National Retarded Children’s Week, Nov. 14-23.  The local association is an affiliate of the National Association for Retarded Children and the California Council for Retarded Children.  Our primary aim is to acquaint the public with the need of these children and of the help that can be given.  Few realize the number of lives that are touched by mental retardation.  Locally plans are in the process of completion for use of the old Valley View School on Mission Valley Road as a day care center and training unit.

Monthly meeting of the San Diego Association for Retarded Children will be held Oct. 21 in the Alice Birney School auditorium and will be devoted largely to work on the campaign. Time 8 p.m.

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Cottage of Israel
Southwestern Jewish Press, October 15, 1954, Page 7

House of Pacific Relations will hold its Annual Fiesta at the House of Hospitality in Balboa Park on Saturday, Nov. 6, at 8 p.m. There will be an outstanding international variety program throughout the evening with dance music by Edmund’s Luminal Orchestra.

This is the single fund-raising event of the year which the House of Pacific Relations sponsors in order to meet their annual operating expenses. We urge our members and friends to attend. Donations are $1.00 and (tickets) can be obtained from president Seymour Gates, CY 8-6338.

In honor of the Succoth Festival, a holiday succah will be on display in the entrance of the Cottage of Israel.

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New Books
Southwestern Jewish Press, October 15, 1954, Page 7

Among the new books which have arrived recently at the San Diego Public Library, 8th Avenue and E Street, is “The Real Enjoyment of Living,” by Hyman Judah Schachtel, Chief Rabbi of the Congregation Beth Israel in Houston, Texas. However, the book is written for people of all creeds that they may gain more real happiness in their every-day lives.

The author emphasizes that three beliefs from the basis for enjoyment of life—belief in God, belief in yourself, and belief in mankind.

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Beth Jacob News
Southwestern Jewish Press, October 15, 1954, Page 7

Sunday and Hebrew School has opened with a record enrollment.  Classes are in full swing, but children are still being accepted for registration. This year both schools are operating with a professional staff, and will be in a better position to enhance the children’s knowledge of Jewish education and culture. A professional teacher has been added to the Hebrew School to augment its curriculum.  For further information call AT 2-2676.

Beth Jacob Plans Adult Study Course – Beth Jacob is very happy to announce the inauguration of a new service to its members and the Jewish Community by the formation of a Study Course on Wednesday, Oct. 27, at 8 p.m.

Then and every Wednesday thereafter the course will include the study of the Siddur, how to daven and understand the Hebrew prayer book.

In conjunction to learning how to read and understand the prayers, the history complementing the prayers will also be taught. If sufficient interest is shown, an expert staff is planned to enhance the course.

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Two Local Men Honored by “Ampal”
Southwestern Jewish Press, October 15, 1954, Page 7

“Ampal” – the American Palestine Trading Corporation – presented two San Diegans with the Bar Mitzvah Award of Honor at a dinner held at the Statler Hotel, Los Angeles last Sunday.

Recipients of the honor were Sol Price, prominent attorney, and Albert A. Hutler, executive director of the United Jewish Fund.

Both were selected for their efforts on behalf of “Ampal” which is an American-Israel Investment corporation promoting and financing such diverse industries as oil exploration, hotels and factories of all kinds.

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Demo Candidate Charges ‘Big Business’ Republican Party

Southwestern Jewish Press, October 15, 1954, Page 7

Dr. Ross T. McIntire, Democratic Candidate for Congress charged today that “Congressman Wilson and the Republican Party are being merchandised in the early tradition of American business—and there are o fair trade laws in political merchandising.”

He said he felt he has two jobs until election day: “First, to tell the people of San Diego about Robert Wilson as their congressman and about the Republican Party generally, and

“Second, to tell them about himself, about what I believe and what the Democratic Party stands for.” Then the Democratic candidate who was President Roosevelt’s personal physician and World War II surgeon general of the Navy continued:

“So let’s look at some of the things Robert Wilson claims to have accomplished in his two years in Washington – accomplishments he has read into the Congressional Record.

“There’s the F-102 contract which he claims to have brought to San Diego with little or no credit to Convair for developing the advanced and revolutionary design; the dredging funds for Mission Bay which in truth were crumbs from the senatorial table – a bit of pork, nonetheless welcome.

“If he could rightly claim credit for all of these items, then as doctor I would be justified in claiming credit for the low incidence of frostbite in San Diego County.

“I would rather talk about the Democratic Party and what it stands for and why I believe in it. It is the party of all the people. It represents no special interests. It puts the welfare of the whole nation above the welfare of any group.”

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“Adventures in San Diego Jewish History” is sponsored by Inland Industries Group LP in memory of long-time San Diego Jewish community leader Marie (Mrs. Gabriel) Berg. Our “Adventures in San Diego Jewish History” series will be a regular feature until we run out of history.  To find stories on specific individuals or organizations, type their names in our search box.  

 

Adventures in San Diego Jewish History, September 3, 1954, Part 2

July 10, 2010 Leave a comment


Compiled by San Diego Jewish World staff

Personals
Southwestern Jewish Press, September 3, 1954, Page 3

Home From Abroad—Nelson Olf, son of Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Olf, has ended his midshipman summer training in European waters aboard the USS Wisconsin, and is expected home.  He will have just a few days with his parents before leaving to begin the fall semester at Oregon State College.

While in London, Nelson and his shipmates visited the Tower of London and saw the changing of the guard. The cultureal hnigh spot was his attendance at the Paris Opera House for a performance of “Rigoletto.”

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Short Visit
– Alan Breslauer, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. Breslauer, has finished a course at an Army school in Norfolk and will return home this week for a visit with his parents.  Alan plans to make up for lost time with his friends while he’s here because before long he’ll be headed back to an Army School in New York.
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Pleasant Duty
—At his annual summer duty with the Naval Reserve, Jewish Press columnist Irving Stone will serve on a special research project for the Navy which will take him by carrier to Hawaii.  He left Wednesday and will return by plane about the middle of September.

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Good Timing—The Nate Schillers and family have been showing off San Diego to cousins, Mr. and Mrs. Mason Miller of Riverdale, N.Y.  The Millers and their two children, Peggy and Michael, have been on a tour of the entire United States, but only here did they have the unexpected pleasure of arriving in time to neet a new relative—the brand new son of Harley and Mitzi Schiller Babbitz.

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Betrothal Announced – Mr. and Mrs. Robert I. Berkun are happy to announce the engagement of their daughter, Anita, to Calvin Green, son of Mr. Ernest Green of Escondido. No wedding date has been set.

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Farewell But Not Goodbye – An equal share of parting tears and pride in children’s achievement is the lot of many parents this month. The annual exodus of college students starts this weekend and judging by the numbers leaving San Diego, the town should be pretty quiet until the next school holiday.

Some of those leaving to attend UCLA are Linda Solof, Eileen Rivers, Sandra Schissell, Rosalyn and Elaine Burdman, Arline Mallen, Bunny Goodman, Ro9nny Greenberg, Stanton Camiel, Jerry Schissell, Leonard Naiman and David Levens.

USC calles Esther Jane Lustig, Carol Fischer and Anita Weinstock.  Gene Freed will attend USC Medical School.

Expecting great thing from the next year at the University of California at Berkeley are Jean Goldstein, Judy Yukon, Paul Kaufman, Michael Soule and Burton Sharpe.

Sam Sosna will return to Stanford.  Danny Schaffer leaves for Harvard, and Kay Miller enters M.I.T.

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Eastern Visitor – The many San Diego friends of Mrs. Rose Plotnick of Norwalk, Conn., are glad to learn that she is in town visiting her daughter, Mrs. S. Kerper.

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Good Luck!
– The Leon Heimans with their two lovely daughters,  Brenda and Ilene, have moved into their new home at 5822 Barbarossa Ct.  The dog, Skipper, is the only one not delighted with the change – the “verboten” new carpeting is forcing him to change his habits. Friends with gardening tools: please call.

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V.I.P. – Richard Silberman is going great guns with his Kay-Lab Corp.  His association with La Motte Cohu will enable him to expand his ideas in this new electronics field.

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Lefty O’Doul Take Note –Joel Mogy’s baseball career seems will assured.  Playing centerfield for the S.D. team in Nebraska for the American Legion Jun ior baseball tournament, he has been one of the mainstays of the local nine.

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He Never Had It So Good!
—Elfie Schwitkis’ skunk left home last week after living I the lap of luxury for 3 months.  Elfie fed her de-skunked pet a diet of chicken and avocados.

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(Thanks)–Mrs. A. Breslauer wishes to thank her friends for their kindnesses during her recent hospitalization and convalescence.

Mr. and Mrs. M.S. Berlin wish to thank their friends for their kindnesses during his recent illness.

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Please Note! – Mrs. Irvine M. Schulman has accepted the post of treasurer of the George Neumann Memorial Fund. All those who wish to make contributions to any charity through this fund may contact Mr. Schulman at BE 3-8393 or write to 333 Plaza, Room 311.

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Nothing Gained – If all the investigations in the world were placed end to end they would never reach a conclusion.

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(Mother’s Business)– 
No one can say a mother’s business isn’t always picking up.

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Cradle
Southwestern Jewish Press, September 3, 1954, Page 3

It’s a second boy for Mr. and Mrs. Harley Babbitz (Mitzi Schiller).  Two year old Russell (Rusty) may not be impressed with the following statistics, but will welcome the new playmate.  David Edward, weighing 7 lbs, 4 ½ oz., was born on Monday, August 30 at 10:00 a.m.

Grandparents are Mrs. Henry Babbitz of Sioux City, Iowa and Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Schiller.

*

The stork had a busy schedule last Monday morning: for just 38 minutes later – at exactly 10:38 a.m. on August 30, weighing 5 lbs, 11 oz, Miss Suzie Arlene was born to Mr. and Mrs. Frank Goldberg (Lee Winicki).

Susie is the first child for the Frank Goldbergs and the second grandchild for Mr. and Mrs.  Frank Winicki.  Mrs. Jean Goldberg is paternal grandmother.

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Classified
Southwestern Jewish Press, September 3, 1954, Page 3

For Rent – Large newly furnished room with kitchen privileges in lovely new home in La Mesa.  HO 9-7266.

Room for Rent with 2 single beds.  Kitchen privileges.  BR-7-3361 or CY-6-2905.

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Calendar
Southwestern Jewish Press, September 3, 1954, Page 3

11th –Beth Jacob P.T.A. Square Dance Frolic – B.J. Center – 8:00 p.m.

11th –Cottage of Israel 4th Annual Open Meeting – Tifereth Israel Center – 8:00 p.m.

15th—Jewish War Veterans Talent Show – War Memorial Bldg – 8:15 p.m.

19th – Poale Zion 2nd Annual Dinner – House of Hospitality Lounge

19th – B’nai B’rith Girls’ Mother and Daughter Tea –1201 Trieste Dr – 2:00 p.m.

20th – Birdie Stodel Membership Luncheon – Beth Jacob Center – 12 noon

22nd – Beth Israel Sisterhood “Breakfast with Sisterhood” – Manor Hotel – 11;00 a.m.

24th – Hadassah Israeli Fashion Show – State Theatre – 1:30 p.m.

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As the Psychologist Sees You
Southwestern Jewish Press, September 3, 1954, Page 4

By Irving R. Stone, Psychological Consultant

What’s New In Print – Let’s continue with our consideration of the psychological impact of the news in our morning paper.  Last time, you remember, we discussed the front page the general current events, and the theatrical page. Suppose we now turn to the sports section.

The late Knute Rockne, one of the greatest football coaches, was a great believer in psychology,  His use of the subject in the development of his teams was almost as important as the development of teamwork.  He instilled a fighting spirit in his teams that roused them to a pitch almost bordering on rage.  Baseball managers use similar techniques. When a team is on a winning streak, the spirit of winning at all costs permeates from the coach to the players and even down to the fans in the stands.  There are more fights among the spectators when their team is on the road to a championship than when it is among the cellar dwellers.

The editorial page next invites our attention. Here there is a definite attempt to sway our thoughts. Just as the writers of the editorials formulate their opinions, so must we as readers take a stand.  (T)he extent to which we conform to the thoughts of the writers often will determine the continuation of our purchasing of the paper.  Sometimes editorials lull us to a sense of security, others incite us to action, still others arouse an awareness of our own needs.

Let’s not overlook the society page.  Here we have a view of the doings of our friends and neighbors, or possibly a recognition of things we would like for ourselves. We read that Mr. and Mrs. Jones are taking a trip and instantly toss in our own minds of how much we would like to make this trip, instead of being tied down to the duties of daily living. We are motivated to keep up with the Jones’s.

Now to the advertisements. Quite naturally, newspaper ads are there to prompt us to buy If the article, because of its clever display and attractive design, has any value for us and satisfies a desire or need, and is relatively within our means, we are prompted to purchase it. But, without the ad we would give little or no thought to the possibility of purchasing the merchandise. Television advertising has captures much of the power of newspaper advertising because it can dramatize and make the product more appealing to us by placing the merchandise in our own homes.  We can remember better those things we can see placed in a natural setting.

In most newspapers we find a page or more of comics. Old and young alike turn to them with glee, often as the first thing looked at in the newspaper. That is why the Sunday paper is so popular on the day before the publication date, even though the news is general and often “stale.”  Most comics are no longer humorous incidents but are serous, thrilling stories, some believable happenings of ordinary people, and others fanciful, fantastic, nerve-tingling adventures.  The former are playful reflections of ourselves and the latter leads us on a merry chase, allowing us to live the lives of people we’d like to be, doing things we’d like to do.

Even the little items of the weather reports has psychological importance for upon it is based our activities. The farmer knows when to plant and reap his crops, the schoolboy knows whether he can play his ball game, the housewife knows whether she should wear her new dress to go shopping or whether to hang out the week’s washing, and the store manager knows whether he should put out his display of umbrellas. It can put us in a rage, when it is at variance with our plans, or fill us with glee when it allows us to complete our plans for the day.

And so, we arrive at the end of our little trip through the pages of our newspaper. The psychologist sees more than words or newsprint. To him, each page is filled with interesting material for psychological study. What’s New in Print has more than events, it is a study of human behavior.

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(Money and Happiness)
Southwestern Jewish Press, September 3, 1954, Page 4

It’s a fact money cannot buy happiness, but it places the possessor in an excellent bartgaining position.

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(Talking and saying)
Southwestern Jewish Press, September 3, 1954, Page 4

Anyone can talk—saying something is more difficult.

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(Wife’s influence)

Southwestern Jewish Press, September 3, 1954, Page 4

A husband under his wife’s thumb may be underprivileged, but seldom under indictment.

(Old Age)
Southwestern Jewish Press, September 3, 1954, Page 4

It’s a good thing that old age happens only once in a lifetime

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Jewish War Vets Stage Talent Show
Southwestern Jewish Press, September 3, 1954, Page 4

The S.D. Post and Auxiliary No. 185, Jewish War Veterans, will sponsor a Talent Show, on Wednesday evening, September 15 at 8:15 p.m., in the San Diego Veterans War Memorial Bldg., in Balboa Park.  There will be no admission charge and refreshments will be served immediately following the talent show, states Harry Apelman, who is in charge of the entertainment program for the month of September.

There will be acrobatic dancing; tap and soft shoe dancing; comic accordion duets; guitar and singing duets; an accordion and bass viol quintet combination; authentic Hawaiian dancers; pantomimics and other talent.

Several loving cup trophies will be presented as well as many beautiful and useful gifts which are being donated by generous members and merchants. Don’t forget the date: Wednesday, September 145.  The place, San Diego Veterans War Memorial Bldg., Balboa Park. The Time: 8:15 p.m.  Bring your Veteran friends, it’s all Free.

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Cottage of Israel Holds 4th Annual Meeting
Southwestern Jewish Press, September 3, 1954, Page 4

Cottage of Israel cordially invites its members and friends to attend their fourth annual open meeting on Saturday, Sept. 11 at 8 p.m. in the North Auditorium of Tifereth Israel Center.

Nominations and election of officers for 1954-55 will take place at this time an appropriate program will be offered.  In commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the death of Theodore Herzl, Mr. John H. Ellsworth, president of the San Diego Museum of Man will deliver an oration in his memory.  Mr. Ellsworth who is a dramatic speaker with a background of radio experience will base his address on one of the most colorful figures of modern Zionism.

Also featured on the program will be Mrs. Seymour Gates, pianist, Sonia Weitzman with Songs of Israel, and Israeli dances by Ethel Mallinger.

Refreshments will be served following the program.  There is no admission charge and it is hoped that all friends of the Cottage of Israel will attend.

*
(Lines and Ropes)

Southwestern Jewish Press, September 3, 1954, Page 4

Pinky Lee: “Many men think they are handing a girl a line when they are merely being roped in.”

*

“Adventures in San Diego Jewish History” is sponsored by Inland Industries Group LP in memory of long-time San Diego Jewish community leader Marie (Mrs. Gabriel) Berg. Our “Adventures in San Diego Jewish History” series will be a regular feature until we run out of history.  To find stories on specific individuals or organizations, type their names in our search box.

Choose Hope

July 7, 2010 14 comments

Editor’s Note: We previously noted in a column that we hungered for positive contributions about people whose lives are inspirations to us.   We thank Sarah Cooper, and The Forum, the quarterly publication of Mothers and More,  in which this article was copyrighted in the May issue, for sharing this first place essay.  Sarah is the daughter of Jane and Dan Schaffer of San Diego.  If other readers have positive stories to tell about the people in their lives, we urge them to share them.

By Sarah Cooper

My mom, Jane, is the last person I thought would get brain cancer young, at 61. She seemed indomitable, a road warrior on a mission. As a high school English teacher, she wanted to prepare students to tackle freshman composition in college, largely to make up for her failing grade in English when she was 18. After raising the essay scores of students in her school, she developed a nationally known writing program and incorporated her own business, in which she gave writing workshops for English teachers and published curriculum guides. Until three years ago, airports were nothing to her. When I went to college on the East Coast, she frequently flew out to meet me “on the way home” from a workshop in Dallas or Chicago—and home was in San Diego.

Along the way, she let me, her only child, watch TV at midnight during a bout of junior high insomnia,cajoled me into writing seven drafts of my college application essay, and cooked me over-easy eggs and toast for dinner. My own children are still little, but already I’m making my older son eggs and toast after school, buttered just as she did, and trying to say “Really? What do you think about that?”rather than ask too many invasive questions when I pick him up from kindergarten. Already I sense her seemingly laissez-faire yet critically observant eye in my motherhood persona.

Although my mom retired from daily teaching in 2001, giving a farewell speech at graduation in which she spoke of classrooms as “an oasis in adolescence, islands filled with rigorous academics andrelentless caring,” a year ago she had the chance to return to this oasis when she helped some friends teach AP English literature at her old school. The students called her “Mama Jane” and wrote her a poem, in sestina form, as tribute. During part of the year, my mom got chemo treatments on Thursday and returned to the classroom on Friday. She wrote up three-page lesson guides and sent them on to me, a middle school English teacher, so I could see her mind grinding through ideas. Last summer, buoyed by her recent teaching experience, she did her first writing workshop in years for a school that already knew her. Last October, she gathered several members of her “brain trust,” a group of people she hired to do workshop presentations, to brainstorm about her writing program for two days. Watching her—as she has continued to teach teachers, high school students, and her own grandsons—there is no room for me to despair.

Although I’ve always been pretty driven, I used to find it easier to take time to do nothing, to watchTV, to fritter away a couple of hours. Now I feel as if every minute must count. The clichés about seizing the day pile up because they are so true. We don’t know, any of us, how long we’ll be here. I also have less patience when dealing with people posturing about unimportant issues. “Cut the crap,” I think in my least charitable moments. “My mom has brain cancer. What’s your excuse?” And this tough-girl stance has changed my mom’s and my relationship. I used to complain to her about my worries, the slings and arrows that crossed my path each day. Our meals and shopping trips together used to be a litany of how my life could best be analyzed and scrutinized. Now the conversation is more give and take.

Aside from watching their physical pain, this must be hardest thing about a parent’s becoming ill: You say a final goodbye to your childhood, no matter if you’ve long inhabited adulthood. I feel healthier, more mature for it. I am more stalwart with my own family, more supportive for my parents, more unflappable at work—but at the same time, there’s still a part of me that wants to be taken care of by my mom. It’s been a while since she’s held me and said, “It’ll be OK. It’ll be OK.” Because, you know,it probably won’t. She will fight this scourge as much as anyone on earth can—friends have sent her Dylan Thomas’ “Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night” because she epitomizes the poem’s theme—but eventually, like all of us, she will die. And it likely will be sooner than my child or young adult self would have hoped or imagined. But in the meantime, I’ll be damned if I don’t choose hope over despair, each minute I am awake, to do honor to her take-no-prisoners, awe-inspiring, kick-ass example.

*

Sarah Cooper has been a member of Pasadena, CA Chapter 252 of Mothers & More for three years and is grateful to Mothers & More for introducing her to such dynamic women and important issues. She lives near Los Angeles with her husband and two young sons, Noah and Sam. Last year Sarah published a book on teaching, Making History Mine: Meaningful Connections for Grades 5-9.

Adventures in San Diego Jewish History, June 25, 1954, Part 3

June 20, 2010 1 comment

Compiled by San Diego Jewish World staff
Southwestern Jewish Press, June 25, 1954, Page 4

Letter to the Editor

Dear Mr. Kaufman

Thos of us who attended the Israeli Day Celebration at Tifereth Israel Synagogue were very much impressed by the speaker, General Eliahu Ben-Hur and the supporting program.

I wish to express my deepest appreciation to those persons who helped plan and organize the program.  It isn’t necessary to mention names—the list would be too long but those who helped will know that their efforts were greatly appreciated.

It is regrettable that so many people whose help was solicited are so completely indifferent to the progress of Israel and to the work being carried on in this country to help promoted that progress, that they feel annoyed and imposed upon when their help in promoting one Israeli celebration per year is requested.

Indifference to a program is a personal matter and not especially regrettable but indifference to the entire question of aid to Israel is one on which considerable confusion appears to exist.  So many of us who consider ourselves good Jews and identify ourselves with the Jewish community as a whole, yet reject so much that is basic in Jewish life.

Perhaps it is first necessary for each of us to determine the basic reason for our personal identification with Judaism. I strongly suspect the reason is the same for all of us although a great many reasons are expressed by many people.  It seems to me that the reason we Jews cling so tenaciously to Judaism is that it answeres our individual need to belong to a group I which we are wholly accepted and needed.

For so many generations, small Jewish groups have been scattered throughout the world. No matter where they were, they always felt their Judaism was oriented towards Israel.  If we reject this orientation, we reject our affiliations with Judaism as a whole.

Let us hope that in the future we will be able to work together at least in commemorating the one great Jewish achievement of our time, the establishment of the State of Israel.

Cordially,
Fred Yaruss, Chairman
S.D. Zionist Council

*
{Editor Mac Kaufman replies}
Southwestern Jewish Press, June 25, 1954, Page 4

In a letter printed elsewhere on this page, the chairman of the Zionist Council bemoans the fact that people are indifferent to celebrations marking the anniversaries of the State of Israel.  He also accuses people of being confused as to their loyalties I Jewish life. In doing so, he makes two amazing statements.

He states, “It seems to me that the reason we Jews cling so tenaciously to our Judaism is that it answers our individual need to belong to a group in which we are wholly accepted and needed.” The chairman obviously has missed the entire point regarding Jewish religious survival for the past 200 years. It didn’t answer any individual need—to be hounded, tortured, burned at the stake, and ostracized.  Jews didn’t decide to belong to any group, there was o questioning they were Jews and lived and died for their religious beliefs.

We again quote, “For so many generations, small Jewish groups have been scattered through the world, no matter where they were, they always felt that their Judaism was oriented toward Israel.  If we reject this orientation, we reject our affiliation with Judaism as a whole.”

Does the chairman of the Zionist Council really mean that Jews living in other lands, who do not look toward Israel as the fountain head of their religion and spiritual life are not Jews?  As far as American Jews are concerned, I suspect that we will survive and continue to expand the influence of Judaism among our people without dropping our interest in Israel as a state.  Of course we are concerned for her welfare. That’s why we contribute so much money.  Of course we will continue to use our influence to defend and help her – but please, Mr. chairman, don’t tell us we are not good Jews if we are not oriented toward Israel. It’s too bad that more Zionists don’t go to Synagogue to see the increased religious sensitivities among Jews of all ages.  It would show them that Judaism need not be centered in any one country or state.

*

Jews in American History
Southwestern Jewish Press, June 25, 1954, Page 4

By Dr. Philip L. Seman, University of Judaism

When John Brown set out to free the slaves he was accompanied by three Jews who had come from parts of Europe where the Jews were still suppressed and persecuted in a state comparable to that of the slaves in America. One of these men was Theodore Weiner, who had come from Poland, the second was Jacob Bernstein, born in Bohemia, and the third, August Bondy, came from Vienna.

They had settled in Kansas and it seemed to them the most natural thing I the world that the slaves should be freed and given equal rights. This, however, did not seem so to their neighbors, who proceeded to burn down Weiner’s barn; such incidents happened to many who were actively involved in anti-slavery activities.

These three Jews were amazed and dismayed.  They understood they had let themselves in for a considerable amount of trouble. They had come from countries where they had been less than slaves, to a country where they were considered free and equal citizens.  However, there seemed to be a condition attached to this new status of equality.  The condition was that they should refrain from thinking that everybody else in the country should be free and equal too.  If they continued to have such ideas, they were bound to suffer.

There was still time to back out, but somehow these Jews could not do so, even though they were not at all the fighting type.  They were peaceful citizens, men who wanted to work and live quietly.  They had no desire to go to war, to spend their nights in the field, to ambush their opponents, much less kill them.  They had even less taste for revolt, and they were grateful that they had been taken in. To be sure, they worked hard and took care of themselves, so that they were on burden to their country. But they felt that perhaps, it was not the right thing for men who had so recently become Americans to tell other Americans what to do.  It was, perhaps, tactless—and this was not to speak of the dangers involved, personal, physical dangers in case of a revolt and the danger of their social position in general. They were practical men, they were realists and for a long time they told themselves that the thing to do was to be silent and to do nothing. If the Americans wanted to keep a part of their own people in slavery that was their business.

But in spite of such reflections, in spite of all their practical deliberations, their feelings that the slave question was their business grew stronger and stronger within them. Besides, the fact that they themselves had escaped by coming to this country imposed upon them a moral obligation, a definite duty to help others in their fight for liberation. That is why they joined John Brown, a man who was regarded by many as a revolutionary and of a very dubious character.  They joined him even though they were somewhat uncertain of their ability to do actual fighting. They joined him because they could not do otherwise. (To be continued).

*
As the Psychologist Sees You
Southwestern Jewish Press, June 25, 1954, Page 4

By Irving R. Stone, Psychological Consultant

School’s Out – Perhaps you heard the same hurried footsteps and the shouts of youngsters that I heard the other day. You might have wondered, as I did, what caused the happy and almost frantic running and shouting. A glance at the desk calendar soon gave me the answer. There was a very good reason for the children’s glee.

With the closing of schools for the summer months, new problems confront teachers, parents, and even the children. Most teachers find that they must either take courses during the summer in order to meet credential requirements, to complete preparations for advanced degrees, or to qualify for salary increases, or must find some work during what should be their vacation period in order to supplement an inadequate salary.

Parents, too, are perplexed as to how to handle the situation of having their youngsters literally under their feet for five or six additional hours of the day. Some overcome the problem by sending their children away to camp for weeks at a time or to day camp.  Others find that they can take a few hours a day for their own vacations by spending the time at the beach. Still others use the time to visit relatives, take motor trips as a family unit to places of interest, or stock the car or trailer with needed equipment and go off to some restful area for camping.

Finally, the children have a problem. At last they have an opportunity to sleep late, to stay up a little later before going to bed, to play in the neighborhood as much as they’d like and to go to the movies more often than on Saturday afternoons. But all that is interesting for about a week and then the sudden change has its reactions.  Unless there is a plan of activity, boredom sets in.

Some children find summer school attendance a satisfaction instead of a chore. Although many attend in order to make up for a scholastic deficiency, an equal number go to participate in advanced courses or recreational programs such as arts and crafts or music. Others find the courses conducted by the zoo or museum of great interest. Still others take part in recreational activities conducted by the city recreation department, while some attend day camps sponsored by community centers.

School’s Out may be a problem to teachers, parents and children but they are problems that can be, and are, solved by most.  However, where there is no planning there is little enjoyment of what should be a time for fun, education and relaxation.

*
From Where I Sit

Southwestern Jewish Press, June 25, 1954, Page 4

By Mel Goldberg

It seems a shame that the U.S. Government doesn’t take advantage of its best resource for a security checking board. We refer to an examination team that would be made up of nice little old Jewish grandmothers… Let them examine a doubtful witness as they would a chicken—and we guarantee that if the person in question ate Russian dressing on a salad in 1944, they’d detect it quicker than all of McCarthy’s assistants. … Just consider Grandma’s qualifications…. What inquisitions those poor ole chickens had to go through before Grandma tabbed ‘em okeh for human consumption.

The gizzard and liver inspection was a probe more detailed than an autopsy conducted under the personal supervision of the Mayo Brothers … Heaven forbid, the chicken should have had a slight bruise—then the poultry man, “That terrible goniff,” was plotting to poison us by the most heinous of methods … ah, those were the days! …The worst task that could confront a “modern” grandchild was to assist Grandma shopping… To accompany her to a store selling fruit or baked goods was a horrifying experience. Each roll or peach represented an individual challenge. It had to be felt, scrutinized and squeezed thoroughly … This was the original “third degree.”

The dirty looks of the disconcerted storekeeper meant absolutely nothing in Grandma’s eyes… Small merchants were a world apart, and represented a highly organized movement to separate the poor housewife from her money with shoddy merchandise at inflated prices. Grandma didn’t need any such thing as a government price control on commodities… every purchase was followed by the same familiar tune, that ran something like this –“What do you mean you want five dollars for it?  Can’t you take four?  It can buy it by Feinbaum down the street for that.”
*
The audience at the Wednesday Club recital of Cantor Cysner could not help but marvel; at the agility of the custodian there, 94-year-old John Olson. Mr.Olson tends the grounds, stacks the chairs, etc., and even looks after the trash cans of neighbors in the area. The irony of the story is – when Mr. Olson came to San Diego 21 years ago and applied for a similar club at the Thursday Club, he was turned down because he was “too old!” 

Emmanuel Mayer, a former San Diegan, who now resides near Guadelajara, Mexico, is spending a few months here.  According to him, the weather in that section of Mexico makes our local climate look pretty foul. Until we talked with Mayer, we had felt sorry for the people who live in the rest of the U.S.  He’s sorry for us so we don’t know who’s sorry for who now!

*
Joe Weiss heard about a sword swallower who choked to death.  He wasn’t “fixed for blades.” … Julius Monteer’s definition of an optimist:  A man who is 85 years of age contemplates marriage and insists upon looking for an apartment near a public school… Wonder how Jack Tenney can twist this around: Two prominent members of the Los Angeles Jewish community—Arthur A. Dresser, an attorney, and Harold B. Garfield, a  member of the California State Board of Pharmacy – have presented a 100-acre campus site, secured by them at a cost of $400,000 to the proposed new Baptist University of San Fernando Valley.

One of the alleged problems in San Diego is the social life of the young single Jewish adult. Frankly, we can’t see any great problems involved with the young adults … When we say young—we mean just that—and not our good friends, who like the writer, clutch to the creeping years and prefer to forget the last six, eight, and in some cases, ten birthdays… Many women in this older age group face a terrific problem in locating a suitable Jewish social group with which to affiliate…. Frequently limited finances prevent their aligning themselves with a religious organization’s clubs – and those who must work for a living, as most of these folks do, cannot link themselves with the luncheon meeting, mah-jong playing type of group. This is a problem that could be alleviated by some concerted planning during the summer months.

As  to the social problems of the young single adult: If the guys would stop thinking that they are Heaven’s gift to women available in human form, and if the girls would realize that they are not Marilyn Monroesteins in any shape—for certain, or manner, and if in addition to this both sexes would “do” a little “doing” in the existent organizations, the bored ones would have a lot less to grouse about … We’re fixin’ to hear a lot of criticism on our philosophy and we’ll be happy to discuss the subject at greater length.

*
Institute to be Held by Hospital Council

Southwestern Jewish Press, June 25, 1954, Page 4

The Hospital Council of San Diego County and the California Hospital Association will co-sponsor a Hospital Public Relations Institute in San Diego on Friday, July 9, 1954.  Louis Peelyon, President of the Hospital Council and Administrator of Grossmont Hospital, announced.

The Institute is one of a series to be held throughout the State and is conducted under the auspices of the Council of Public Education, California Hospital Association.

*
Double Talk

Southwestern Jewish Press, June 25, 1954, Page 5

By Janet and Susan Solof.

Hi All!

Quite a number of our gals and guys received honors and scholarships at the recent graduations of the different high schools. Some of these include Elaine Burdman and Eileen Rivers receiving the student faculty scholarship, Elana Barach with a scholarship to Milwaukee Donner College, Judy Yukon a scholarship to University of California, Gloria Abrahamson, B’nai B’rith Youth of the year award, Sigmond Ohrback, outstanding grades, Ed Ruskin received the honor of Boys highest scholastic grades, Lawrence Schiller, a scholarship to Pepperdine College and Dan Schaffer a scholarship to Harvard University. Congrats to you all for your outstanding work.

Heading Wilson Jr. High School’s student government for next year is Phil Brenes who was recently elected President of the school. Gold luck, Phil.

Vacationing in L.A. for fun and business were Janet Solof and Luanne Blumberg who was sent as representatives to the Red Cross Convention as officers of the Jr. Red Cross.

On her way to Girl’s State is Sherry Newman and from there to the University of Denver for the summer.

Lenny Weiss, Larry Cahan, Myron Shapiro and Steve Kirchtel motored to New York for the summer and Gary Chenkin is leaving for Mexico City.

Ellen Goldstein is spending the entire summer touring Europe. Also Henrietta and Bobby Faguet.

“Sharing the fun of being sweet sixteen is not half so great as experiencing it yourself.”  My sister Janet quoted these words after a lovely dinner given at the San Diego Club for the Sweet Sixteen birthday. Many of her friends shared the thrill with her. She was honored at a surprise beach party given by her school friends.

Sixteenth birthdays seem to be in style and a pretty good style at that. Adrienne Sachnoff as she celebrated her sixteenth birthday in real style with a lovely luncheon at Town and Country Club with a group of her many friends. Best wishes, Adrienne.

“That’s what I call fun” were the remarks made after Morton Cohn’s terrific party. A bar-b-que and dancing made the party complete.

Leani Leichtag entertained her friends with a beautiful party. The gang swam, ate and danced and had fun.

Among those who invaded our fair city, returning from college are Esther Lustig, Gary Breitbard, Burt Sharp, Linda Solof, Larry Solomon, Roslyn Burdman, Sam Sosna, Jean Goldstein.

Have a wonderful vacation and phone your news to CY-5-0679.

Money Still Talks
Southwestern Jewish Press, June 25, 1954, Page 5

An angry man should count to ten before he speaks – if his wife is angry he should count out ten and let them speak for him.
*
“Adventures in Jewish History” is sponsored by Inland Industries Group LP in memory of long-time San Diego Jewish community leader Marie (Mrs. Gabriel) Berg. Our indexed “Adventures in San Diego Jewish History” series will be a regular feature until we run out of history. 

Adventures in San Diego Jewish History, May 28, 1954, Part 4

June 12, 2010 Leave a comment

Compiled by San Diego Jewish World staff
Southwestern Jewish Press, May 28, 1954, page 6

Tifereth Israel Sisterhood installation ceremonies and brunch will take place June 1 at 12:00 noon in the Tifereth Israel Center.  A wonderful program, “Color Through the Years,” has been planned, with Mrs. Victor Weiss in charge. Ann Schloss is circle captain.

The following officers and board members have been elected for next year: Pres., Mrs. Harry Wax; Ways and Means Vice-Pres., Mrs. Louis Feller;  Cultural Vice-Pres., Mrs. Arthur Gardner; Membership Vice-Pres, Mrs. Ben Gordon; Program Vice Pres., Mrs. Daniel Orlansky; Rec. Sec., Mrs. Paul Belkin; Corr. Sec., Ross Ann Feldstein; Fin. Sec., Mrs. Sam Lennett; Treas., Mrs. Edward Baranov; and auditor, Mrs. Sarah Bystrom.  New Board members are: Mrs. Lewis Solomon, Marie Richards, Molly Prager, Mrs. Frank Pomeranz, Mrs. Joseph Kader, Lillian Berwin, Mrs. Joe Spatz, and Mrs. G. Winicki.

Rabbi Monroe Levens will be installing officer.  Please make your  reservations early so that we may plan accordingly.  Call Jean Schreibman, Atwater 4-3351; Sarah Krasnow, Juniper 2-2583, or Rosalie Sonnabaum, Atwater 2-0173.

*
Council Women Hold Installation June 2
Southwestern Jewish Press, May 28, 1954, page 7

The National Council of Jewish Women, San Diego Section, will hold its annual installation luncheon on Wednesday, June 2, 12:00 noon at Town and Country off Mission Valley Freeway.

The theme “Council Cinemascope” will depict the organization’s accomplishments during the past year.  The room will be decorated as a motion picture theatre with screen, lights and cameras.  The program will be highlighted by the appearance of Loretta Jewell, popular actress and San Diego personality.  She will give intimate glimpses of Hollywood and stories of the stars.

Installations will be conducted by Dr. William J. Rust, President of California Western University.  Guests of honor include Mr. Edgar Brown of the Community Welfare Council; Mr. Al Hutler, United Jewish Fund.  Members of the press will also attend. Chairman of this affair is Mrs. Irving Alexander assisted by Mrs. Milton Effron, Mrs. Morris Sims, Mrs. Marvin Jacobs, Mrs. Joseph Kwint, Mrs. David Jaffe, Mrs. Milton Fredman, Mrs. Robert Speigel, Mrs. Robert Drexler and Mrs. Morton Kantor.

All persons desiring transportation contact phone chairman: AT 4-1609; AGT 1-0120, JU 2-4933.

*
Personals

Southwestern Jewish Press, May 28, 1954, page 7

Welcome Home – Rose and Lee Greenbaum changed their South American cruise plans in mid-ocean and sailed only as far as Buenos Aires.  Having had enough of the open sea by that time, they changed transportation methods and flew the rest of their holiday time visiting Santiago, Chile, Lima, Peru; Panama and Florida.

After their return to San Diego, Rose and Leo had as their houseguests last week, Ida and Dan Polesky, former San Diegans, now of Los Angeles.

*
Returns Home – After a wonderful month long visit with her family in Denver, Mrs. Sam Tepper has returned home.

Bride Honored – Mrs. Ben Halpern and Mrs. Paul Vereshagin were hostesses at a bridal shower honoring Esther Weitzman on May 8th at the Beth Jacob Center.  Forty guests attended.  Miss Weitzman will wed Andrew Segal on July 11.

Student Awards—Daniel Schaffer, son of Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Schaffer, has received a four-year scholarship to Harvard University.  Daniel will be graduated from Kearny High School next month and upon completing his 4-year course at Harvard expects to study law. 

A scholarship to the University of California at Berkeley was awarded to Judy Yukon, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Yukon.  Judy is a member of Ecivres, the honor organization at Hoover High School and will graduate this June.

Visitors—Mr. and Mrs. Harry Kaplan of Norfolk, Va., have been visiting children, Dr. and MRs. Robert Kaplan (Joan Steinman) of Los Angeles. Chances are that the main attraction for them is grandson, Matthew. The Kaplans, en masse, visited in San Diego with the Louis Steinmans for a week prior to the Steinman’s departure for a month long trip.  Julia and Lou will see relatives in Tucson and St. Louis and will attend the graduation of their niece from Stephens College… (rest of article torn in archive copy}

Mrs. David Levy an her brothers, Judge Jacob Weinberger and Maurice Weinberger, are leaving Saturday to viit their sisters and brothers in Denver for a few weeks.

*
Anniversaries Noted – Among the many “happy marrieds” celebrating the occasion in various ways this week are the George Matins, the Bob Gordons and the Carl Esenoffs.

We’re glad to note that Mrs. Ida Lipinsky is back home again after her sudden illness and hospitalization in Los Angeles.

Mrs. Esther Solov and daughter wish to thank their many friends for their kindnesses during their recent bereavement.

Birthday Party – Frank Berman was toasted at a birthday party in his honor given by Mrs. Berman on his 69th birthday on Sunday, May 16.  Guests were children, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Berman, MR. and Mrs. Sidney Berman, and grandchildren, Elaine, Sandy and Jeff.  Out-of-town guests were Mrs. Krupp and Mary and Jack Rose of Los Angeles.

Honored – Dr. Benjamin B. Faguet, well known psychiatrist, will represent the American Psychiatric Association at the International Conference of Psychotherapy in Zurich, Switzerland this summer.  He has accepted the appointment of Professor of Medical Psychology at the new University of San Diego.

Visitors Daughters—Mrs. Anna Peckarsky left this week for her annual summer sojourn in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.   {Rest of article missing in archive copy.}

Z.B.T. Mothers Club – The Mother’s Club of Zeta Beta Tau, Jewish National Fraternity at State College is having its Second Annual Card Party on Saturday, June 12th at 8 p.m. in the Beth Israel Temple Center. Donation $1.00.  An additional attraction will be entertainment by members of the fraternity. Refreshments will be served.

*
Pi Alpha Lambda At State College
Southwestern Jewish Press, May 28, 1954, page 7

The Mother’s Club of Pi Alpha Lambda Sorority will hold a luncheon and card party Thursday, June 3, at noon at the home of Mrs. Fred Leeds, 4273 Ridgeway Drive. The proceeds will go toward the obtaining of a sorority house near San Diego State College.

Classified
Southwestern Jewish Press, May 28, 1954, page 7

Woman will share modern cozy apartment with working woman. Everything is furnished.  Near bus lines 1 and 2.  AT-1-2102, AT-1-7869.

Driving to N.Y. about June 20.  New. Chev. Will take 1 or 2 riders to share driving and exp.  JU-2-6429 after 5:30 p.m.

Room for Rent.  Nice home, ½ block to El Cajon and 50th bus. Call before noon or after 6:00 p.m. after June 1l1, AT-4-6586.

Sholom Mausoleum Dedicated Sunday
Southwestern Jewish Press, May 28, 1954, page 8

On May 30, the entire community is cordially invited by Tifereth Israel Synagogue and Greenwood Memorial Park to be present at the official dedication of the Sholom Mausoleum.

Rabbi Monroe Levens and Cantor Joseph Cysner will officiate at the Service, which will include a memorial for our departed ones lying at rest in Sholom; as well as a dedication of a memorial plaque, in memory of the six million Jews who lost their lives during the Second World War.

Outstanding features of Sholom are its Jewish motifs and designs incorporating rich symbolism in an atmosphere of beauty and dignity.

Sholom Mausoleum is not merely a corridor in a general mausoleum open to the general public. It is a completely separate building erected exclusively for Jewish use.

The ready acceptance of Sholom Mausoleum by the Jewish community is evidenced by the fact that it will soon be completely reserved, and plans for another addition, doubling its present capacity, are under way.

Tifereth Israel Synagogue has been designated by Greenwood Memorial Park to be in full charge of the operation, planning, design and all matters pertaining to Sholom Mausoleum.

*
Beth Jacob News
Southwestern Jewish Press, May 28, 1954, page 8

Temple Beth Israel will usher in the Shavuoth Holidays with Consecration Services Friday evening, June 4, at 8:00 p[.m.  Members of the Confirmation Class will participate in the Sabbath Services. Alan Friedman and Sandra Byrock will do the Kiddush. A class barbecue lunch will be held at the home of Alan Friedman on Saturday at 11:00 a.m. and a class party including dinner, dancing and swimming will take place at the home of Preston Martin, Saturday afternoon and evening.

Confirmation Services will take place on Sunday at 7:30 p.m. for the 11 members in the Confirmation class.  Rabbi Morton J. Cohn will be honored at the Friday evening services for his 20 years of service to the rabbinate. Hosts and hostesses for the Oneg Shabbat will be board members and their wives.

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Beth Jacob Set for ‘Golden Nugget’ Nite
Southwestern Jewish Press, May 28, 1954, page 8

Plans are nearing completion for the Beth Jacob Men’s Club “Golden Nugget” Nite, Sunday, June 13, at 6 p.m. in the Center, according to Dave Schissel and Julius Penn, co-chairmen.

Never before has so much been offered at an event never to be forgotten. Besides the drawing for the 5-day Las Vegas all expense vacation for two, including free air transportation, there will be a bond as a door prize.  Winner of the trip need not be present and tickets for it are available from any club member.

The finest honest-to-goodness Jewish meal, with all the dishes your mother used to make, will be available for only $1.50 per person, including all you can eat. 

There will also be other prizes including electrical appliances, home furnishings, etc., plus all kinds of games and diversions, bingo, and many other attractions to help spend an enjoyable profitable evening.  As a special feature, for all who are present, there will be lucky draws every 30 minutes.

There will be plenty to eat, plenty to drink , and plenty to do. Get up a party for this tremendous affair, the proceeds of which will go towards reducing the building loan.  Mark the date, June 13, and keep it open for the best time of your life!

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Beth Jacob News
Southwestern Jewish Press, May 28, 1954, page 8

Shavuoth services of Beth Jacob Congregation this year will be as follows:

Sunday, June 6 – 7:00 p.m.; Monday, June 7—9:00 a.m.; Tuesay, June 8—9:00 a.m.  Yizkor will be held at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday, June 8.

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The Beth Jacob Religious School will hold its closing exercises on Sun., June 6 at 10:30 a.m. at the center. Classes will participate in appropriate prayers and a short program.

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“Adventures in Jewish History” is sponsored by Inland Industries Group LP in memory of long-time San Diego Jewish community leader Marie (Mrs. Gabriel) Berg. Our indexed “Adventures in San Diego Jewish History” series will be a regular feature until we run out of history.

 
 

 

Adventures in San Diego Jewish History, May 28, 1954, Part 3

June 10, 2010 Leave a comment

 Compiled by San Diego Jewish World staff

Double Talk
San Diego Jewish World, May 28, 1954, page 4By Janet & Susan Solof

Hi gang!  Here’s what’s cookin’with the Hop Katz.

On the spotlight for many teenagers was the A.Z.A. dance.  Before the dance Jack Sharpe entertained with a wonderful “Before Party.”  Everyone who attended had a really choice time.

Enjoying the music of Tex Beneke at the Annual Policeman’s Ball were Jane Cohn n’ Don Kobernick, Lois Liff ‘n Lenny Weiss, Sharlene Stone n’ Herb Wenig, Janet Solof n’ Steve Kerschtel, Susan Solof n’ Lawrence Schiller and Beverly Kitaen n’ Shearn Platt.

Being greeted with the traditional words “Surprise” was Bob Meyers for all his many friends. The party was rated “tops.”

Our sincerest congratulations to Judy Yukon who received  a scholarship to U.S.C. and to Danny Schaffer who received a scholarship to Harvard University. Also best of luck and congrats to Harvey Cohen recently elected Prexy of J.C.

T.Y.L. will have a short business meeting on June 5th at 7:00 p.m.  The Cashmere Sweater will be raffled and then there will be dancing.  Attention: All ticket holders please turn in your money or tickets as soon as possible. Come and greet the new officers – Pres. Jane Cohn; VP Terry Kitaen; Corr. Sec. Brenda Heiman; Rec. Sec. Leani Leichtag; Treas. Alan Friedman; Dress-Sporty.

Pete Colt, walked away, we stand corrected.  Marched away with the 1st place award as the best drilled individual among the city’s 1`st year ROTC Cadets.  His school, Pt. Loma Hi won 6 of the 8 awards in the competitive drill on May 12.   See you – CY-5-0672.

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June 27 Community Center ‘Lucky’ Nite
San Diego Jewish World, May 28, 1954, page 4

The Jewish Community Center “Lucky” Nite will be held Sunday, June 27, at 6;30 p.m. in Beth Jacob Center, according to Mickey Fredman and Al Solomon, co-chairmen.

This is the event it is hoped will help make up this year’s operating deficit of the JCC.  The affair will be a long evening of fun and frolic, offering wonderful food, drinks, bingo, poker and many other fascinating games of skill and amusement.  Another feature will be a tremendous cake sale .Prizes will be out of this world, according to the committee in charge of this particular phase, and it will shortly be out gathering them in.

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Adams Well Qualified
San Diego Jewish World, May 28, 1954, page 4

A positive juvenile delinquency program and plans for long-needed adequate law enforcement service in the county are to main points of the platform of Henry J. (Hanks) Adams, candidate for sheriff. 

Adams, Stanford University graduate, received training in all branches of police work from 1934-1939, was a special agent for the FBI, 1940-41, and captured more bank robbers in the New Jersey area than any other agent in the history of that district. He ahs served as undersheriff twice, from 1941-42 and from Sept. 1945 to Jan. 1950. 

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J.W.V. Entertain Veteran Patients at Local Ball Game

San Diego Jewish World, May 28, 1954, page 4

San Diego Jewish War Veterans Post No. 185 and Auxiliary will entertain 25 hospitalized patients from the U.S. Naval hospital at all Padre home games at Lane Field.  Marshall Roth, Post Commander, and Theresa Furst, Auxiliary President, are in charge of the project. The box which the group occupies is generously donated by Bill Starr, president of the Padres, and refreshments for the guests are served by the Post.

All members of J.W.V. are expected to attend a short business meeting Wednesday, June 2nd, 8 p.m., at War Memorial Bldg., Balboa Park. Final arrangements for the coming department convention will be discussed. Don’t forget to make your reservations for J.W.V. Convention June 4th to 6th at Hotel del Coronado.

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Editorial Page~Some Interesting Facts
San Diego Jewish World, May 28, 1954, page 5

Compared with the number of employed persons in other large cities and metropolitan areas, the San Diego area is under-represented in two professional and semi-professional job fields, according to an occupation reference guide just published by the National Office of the B’nai B’rith Vocational Service Bureau. The fields are law and undertaking.

The new guide shows that there is only one lawyer in the San Diego area for every 1,390 persons, while the nation as a whole has one practitioner for every 820 persons.

Statistics also indicate possibly more room for funeral directors in the San Diego area, where there is only one undertaker for every 6,250 persons, while the nation as a whole has one for every 3,700.

Such fields as chiropractic and real estate, however, are over-represented in San Diego, in comparison with other cities and areas. The San Diego area has twice the proportion of chiropractors as the rest of the country and two and  one half times the proportion of real estate agents.

In eight fields, the San Diego area closely parallels the national average. These are accounting, architecture, dentistry, optometry, pharmacy, medicine, therapy, and veterinarian medicine. For every 10,000 persons in the San Diego area, there are 24 accountants, 2 architects, 5 dentists, 1 optometrist, 6 pharmacists, 13 medical doctors, 2 therapists and 1 veterinarian.

The Directory also reports that the San Diego area has the 61st highest median family income among cities in the country. This means that half of all the family units here earned more than $3,465 a year, according to the U.s. Census for 1950.  For this reason, the San Diego area is a favorable place for those preparing to embark upon their careers.

Editorial Page~’Educator’s’ Anti-Semitism Shows
San Diego Jewish World, May 28, 1954, page 5

Unless current campus sentiment flops as a barometer, Southern Methodist University of Dallas, Texas, may get the distinction of becoming the first institution of higher learning to oust a faculty member on charges of anti-Semitism.  The “educator” facing this dubious distinction is Professor John Owen Beatty, head of the English Department. Whose authorship of anti-Semitic tracts has aroused a storm of protests and indignation among students and faculty alike.  His latest pamphlet containing the fantastic charge that powerful non-Christian elements – B’nai B’rith, Muscovites, and friends of Israel – were seeking to seize the university was denounced at a faculty meeting by a vote of 114 to 2.  Beatty has long been mouthing the Hitlerite anti-Semitic thesis, but always claiming he was no Jew-hater but merely an objective reporter of facts.  His infamous books, “The Iron Curtain Over Americaaa””” received the accolade from racist Gerald L. K. Smith as the finest of its kind.

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As the Psychologist Sees You
San Diego Jewish World, May 28, 1954, page 5

By Irving R. Stone, Psychological Consultant

We do not need to peruse those newspapers which devote themselves to the sexual  exploits of individuals to read about the topic of today, “Sexual Deviants.”  Hardly a day goes by without some account of unusual sexual behavior appearing in our daily paper. To understand the problem a little better, let us consider the why and how of the condition.

Sexual deviation has been called many things, including character neurotics, sex perverts, sex variants, or sexual psychopaths.  It is only recently that any organized programs of study and treatment have been organized so that these people can be understood, treated and their anti-social behavior controlled.

We frequently think of sexual deviation as being confined to homosexuality but this is only one factor in the problem.  The male homosexual and the female lesbian are treated differently in our society, with only the former subject to criminal action. In many cultures, both homosexual groups are accepted without stigma. Freud pointed out there exists in all persons instincts which become perversion if they are permitted expression.  Thus, when we consider sexual deviants, we must consider the situation and the culture in which they are found.

Another type of sexual deviant concerns the exhibitionist. In the main, this is concerned with males, those who derive sexual gratification from the exposure in public of their sexual organs usually in view of the opposite sex.  Here, again, the cultural factor must be considered and some exhibitionism in our   own culture is accepted. Witness, for example, the young child who doffs her clothes, the nudist, or the fan dancer and   strip tease artist. Even our bathing suits show our acceptance of a modified form of exhibitionism.  But the exhibitionistic and compulsive tendency of the male who acts for his own sexual satisfaction is anti-social and punishable.

Other forms of sexual deviation involve incest (sexual relationships between parent and child or between brother and sister); sadism and masochism; fetishism (sexual gratification from the sight or touch of an object); transvestism (wearing in public the clothes of the opposite sex) and many others.

Perhaps the form which disturbs us the most are the attacks upon young children.  Of all the deviations, this more than others finds little acceptance in other cultures as well as our own.

The sexual deviant needs our careful consideration and help for many of them can be cured—if they want to change. They represent people apart from our social life; they are sick people in need of treatment. People are not born sexually deviated; something in their environmental development has caused a need in adult life for the erotic cravings of his childhood.  The sexual deviant is living in the sexual past. All are lonely, unhappy and anxious individuals, no matter how much they attempt to deny it.

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Lasker Lodge News
San Diego Jewish World, May 28, 1954, page 5

By Lou Levitt

First place   honors in the bowling league went to the Cardinals, captained by Brother Sid Rose. It was a hotly contested league and the suspense was great as the winner wasn’t determined until the last game of the last night of bowling. Sid’s team mates were Gerry Freedman, Jack Harvey, Marshall Zucker, Mack Freedman, Abe Karnes.  The summer bowling league will begin on June 3rd.  Incidentally, 15 San Diego bowlers also beat the Glendale team for a leg on the perpetual trophy.

Our sincerest admiration and thanks to Jack Spatz who is doing such a magnificent job on the membership retention committee. Marshall Zucker and Abe Karnes are also doing an excellent job, having acquired 30 new members since the 1st of the year.

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Cysner in Recital
San Diego Jewish World, May 28, 1954, page 5

Over 250 San Diegans attended a recital by Joseph Cysner last Tuesday evening. Many in the audience included members of Cantor Cysner’s Congregation Tifereth Israel, while familiar with his work with liturgical song, discovered that his capabilities extend to a wide and varied coverage of the world of music.

Cysner’s fine rendition of Schubert’s “Der Musensohn”, and his introduction of several new Israeli songs highlighted an excellent musical evening. He was accompanied by Robert Macdonald, one of the Southland’s most distinguished pianists.

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Absenteeism Unfounded
San Diego Jewish World, May 28, 1954, page 5State Sen. Fred Kraft, this week charged his opponent of trying to create “political smog” with unfounded accusations of absenteeism from legislative sessions.

In answer to this charge of absenteeism, the following figures have been verified by the minute clerk of the State Senate. The record shows that in the 1951 and 1953 regular sessions, Senator Kraft’s attendance was better than 78 percent.  This is higher than the average attendance record of members of the Senate.

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County Fair to Open At Del Mar June 25
San Diego Jewish World, May 28, 1954, page 5The first Southern California Exposition and San Diego County Fair. Formerly the San Diego County Fair, will open an 11-day run at Del mar on June 25.

Every exhibit and event—from atoms to azaleas—will be keyed to the theme, “The World at Your Doorstep.”

The atomic energy exhibit, first and only showing on the Pacific coast, will include 25 separate displays on how the atom affects agriculture, industry, medicine and other activities.

The flower show, always a favorite at past fairs, has been expanded to include varieties of trees, shrubs and flowers from all parts of the world.

Name bands will play to every musical taste.  The exciting modern arrangements of Sauter-Finegan, scheduled for opening day, will be followed June 26 by the consistently popular music of Les Brown and his Band of Renown.  Lawrence Welk and his champagne music will be heard three times—June 28 and 29 and July 5.

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Pi Alpha Lambda News
San Diego Jewish World, May 28, 1954, page 5

By Carole Simmons

Pi A’s will hold their first rush tea June 6th at the home of Ethel Schwartz, vice president.  Invitations were sent to graduating senior girls who may be attending San Diego State College next fall.

A surprise shower was held in honor of Norma Simmons by sorority sisters.  Norma is soon to be wed to Werner Dreifuss in Chula Vista.

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From Where I Sit
San Diego Jewish World, May 28, 1954, page 5

By Mel Goldberg

To fluoridate or not to fluoridate!  It appears that since our health department, medical and dental societies encourages fluoridation and since they have used sane reasoning to evolve their decision; their opinion should be the plan of action to be considered. The major argument, that the anti-fluoridation forces are peddling is: whether civic officials, responsible for our own health, have the right to put a program of this type in force or must the voting citizens decide on it first?  This boils down to sheer nonsense. If our health officials are a bunch of schnooks, they should be removed. We feel that they are intelligent and responsible people and we see no logic in the need for consulting John Q. Public on an issue of this kind.

If this is a voting issue—we predict that some crackpots will get together and demand a vote ach time there is a fire to decide whether and how the fire department should put it out….Come to think about it, let’s have a vote to see if we want our milk pasteurized.  The health department is depriving us of our right to contact undulant fever. And as to food handling in the restaurants when did we have a proposition at the polls concerning dirty fingernails?

The an ti-fluoridation group gripe about the poisonous effects of flourine is ridiculous.  Certainly we know that flouirne in excess is toxic—but so are Vitamin A, chlorine, orange juice, soy beans, bagels,or practically anything you name, if it were humanly possible to consume it in over-abundance. San Diego’s fluoridation program is basically a small fluorine additive to a deficient water supply. The addition brings our water to a fluorine rate that is safe and minimum standard for better health and less tooth decay among children. As yet, we recognize no one with the anti-forces who we consider as an outstanding medical and dental authority….

John Kluchin’s definition of a co-signer: An idiot with a fountain pen … Murray Kaplan says he can hear ‘em waking the G.I.’s at ‘Schine’ … Helen Thomsen, who at one time studied interior decorating is now decorating ‘interiors’ with some of the finest foods available locally. Readers who used to be regulars at her tearoom will be pleased to note that she has taken over Balboa Park’s Café del Rey Moro – thank goodness!  Try the lemon chiffon pie or buttered rum sundae… Story circulating that one witness of the local Congressional hearings has decided for a very good reasons, to notify the committee, he will now name names, that he withheld during the local session…

Israeli counterpart to the U.S. hot dog and English fish and chips is the “falafel,” a concoction of tangy vegetables and spices eaten inside a piece of “pita,” soft, doughy brown bread.  Cost about three cents each… Never underestimate the power of a woman: One local political office seeker who turned up as an eleventh hour candidate is said to be running solely because of the social ambition of his wife.  She has reached as high a position in her set as possible and any rise can only come about through her husband’s election…

One of the most dedicated Jewish anti-Zionists in the U.S. today is a chap named Alfred M. Lilienthal.  His spoutings are so extreme they make even the literature of the American Council for Judaism read like Bonds for Israel campaign publicity. Lilienthal’s latest ravings are expounded in his book, “What Price Israel?” recently published by Regenry. For  some time now, Lilienthal, an ex-State Department employee, has fancies himself as a sage of many subjects. Now, he has the audacity to author a fantastically ideological book and convey the impression that he speaks for even a segment of American Jewry.  This person, Lilienthal, should be about the last likely person to write as a representative of any form of Judaism, Americanism or for our part—human beings.  Though an educated person, a graduate lawyer to boot, his knowledge of Judaism would fit on the head of a pin. As to his range of information regarding Israel, this columnist publicly declares that he will borrow $100 and pay it to any worthwhile charity, if Lilienthal ever spent more than a grand total of 7 days in that country.  One week doesn’t even make John Gunther an authority.

This is not the first time that Alfred M. Lilienthal has overextended himself. During the 1945 San Francisco Conference, as a State Department  employee, he turned up as the “veteran” consultant of veteran affairs, to aid Secretary of State Stettinus.    His understanding   off the affairs of   veterans fell in about the same category of his knowledge of Judaism. When exposed by those who knew him, during his brief unsavory military career, the State Department dropped him like a “hot potato.”  Pvt. Lilienthal’s Army career consisted of a few months junket in Cairo, Egypt, ten times more farcical than the career of Pvt. David Schine. Yes, teacher, even Democracies make errors! During his “holiday” in Cairo, Alfred lived in conditions a level or two below those of Farouk. Lilienthal eventually flipped his lid and was medically discharged back to the States. He has since written much anti-Zionist material, including an article which appeared in that well-known an ti-Communist magazine, “The Reader’s Digest.”

The Harbor House has added a sideline: they’re hawking old abalone shells out in the front yard, 3 for 25 cents… Dr. and Mrs. Harold Elden know that their four boys are active youngsters. But they were hardly prepared for a visit from a sheriff’s deputy who informed  them that son Kenny, aged three and a half. Was “in capping neighborhood sprinklers and flooding the lawns.  Kenny has also earned a reputation for exchanging dogs in various dog houses in the vicinity of his home…

It’s about time the big clothing store near 4th and Broadway repainted the seedy-looking Botany suit sign on the roof of the building. What an eyesore! … Mull this   one   over: most   people tilt their head to the right when they kiss… There’s only one word in the English language that is pronounced differently when capitalized—polish and Polish… Attorney Ed Herman violated the no-swimming rule in Balboa Park, a Sunday ago.  2 ½ year old daughter Gale went bathing in the lily pond and Ed had to jump in and fish her out…

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“Adventures in Jewish History” is sponsored by Inland Industries Group LP in memory of long-time San Diego Jewish community leader Marie (Mrs. Gabriel) Berg. Our indexed “Adventures in San Diego Jewish History” series will be a regular feature until we run out of history.